Poster Title

Effectiveness of College-Based Recovery Programs in Promoting Abstinence or Remission from Alcohol and Drug Use: A Review of the Literature

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Nursing

2nd Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

2nd Student Major

Nursing

Institution

Northern Kentucky University

KY House District #

House District #50; House District #3

KY Senate District #

Senate District #37, Senate District #50

Department

Bachelor's of Science in Nursing Program

Abstract

Effectiveness of College-Based Recovery Programs in Promoting Abstinence or Remission from Alcohol and Drug Use: A Review of the Literature

Jenna Bell and Shelby Olsen

Faculty Mentors: Judi Godsey, PhD, MSN, RN and Anita Phillips, MSN, RN

Northern Kentucky University School of Nursing

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

Background

Students living on college campuses frequently consume alcohol and/or engage in illicit drug use. College campuses can be considered abstinence hostile environments for students at-risk for developing a substance abuse disorder or alcoholism. Recovering students may also see the university environment as potentially threatening to their sobriety. College Recovery Programs (CRPs) offer an innovative approach involving peer-guided services of support and advocacy for students seeking to maintain abstinence or remission.

Methods

A review of the literature was conducted to determine the effect of CRPs for students recovering from addiction while living on college campuses. This review included qualitative studies, randomized controlled trials, and reviews of the literature which describe the experience of recovering students on college campuses and the impact of CRPs in maintaining sobriety.

Results

Research surrounding this topic was found to be sparse in the empirical literature. However, sufficient evidence is available to suggest CRPs offer a positive influence which helps students maintain abstinence or remission from alcohol and substance use.

Conclusions

Social support is essential for students going through recovery. The use of CRPs promote the support necessary to help minimize or avoid many of the frequent triggers inherent in college lifestyle. Recommendations include the implementation of an abstinence and recovery model supported by on-campus mental health and community nursing professionals. Future research is recommended to develop a more clear understanding of the value of college based recovery programs in maintaining abstinence and preventing or reducing the occurrence of substance abuse disorders and alcoholism.

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Effectiveness of College-Based Recovery Programs in Promoting Abstinence or Remission from Alcohol and Drug Use: A Review of the Literature

Effectiveness of College-Based Recovery Programs in Promoting Abstinence or Remission from Alcohol and Drug Use: A Review of the Literature

Jenna Bell and Shelby Olsen

Faculty Mentors: Judi Godsey, PhD, MSN, RN and Anita Phillips, MSN, RN

Northern Kentucky University School of Nursing

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

Background

Students living on college campuses frequently consume alcohol and/or engage in illicit drug use. College campuses can be considered abstinence hostile environments for students at-risk for developing a substance abuse disorder or alcoholism. Recovering students may also see the university environment as potentially threatening to their sobriety. College Recovery Programs (CRPs) offer an innovative approach involving peer-guided services of support and advocacy for students seeking to maintain abstinence or remission.

Methods

A review of the literature was conducted to determine the effect of CRPs for students recovering from addiction while living on college campuses. This review included qualitative studies, randomized controlled trials, and reviews of the literature which describe the experience of recovering students on college campuses and the impact of CRPs in maintaining sobriety.

Results

Research surrounding this topic was found to be sparse in the empirical literature. However, sufficient evidence is available to suggest CRPs offer a positive influence which helps students maintain abstinence or remission from alcohol and substance use.

Conclusions

Social support is essential for students going through recovery. The use of CRPs promote the support necessary to help minimize or avoid many of the frequent triggers inherent in college lifestyle. Recommendations include the implementation of an abstinence and recovery model supported by on-campus mental health and community nursing professionals. Future research is recommended to develop a more clear understanding of the value of college based recovery programs in maintaining abstinence and preventing or reducing the occurrence of substance abuse disorders and alcoholism.