Title

Focus Study for E. coli in the Clayton Creek Watershed

Presenter Information

Palistha ShresthaFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Environmental Engineering Technology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Mike Kemp

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

This Focus Study for E. coli in the Clayton Creek Watershed aimed to assess the water quality of the stream and determine the sources of E. Coli present in and around the watershed area. This study was initiated as a response to the sampled data collected from available scientific, government and volunteer sources.

Water samples were taken from 9 different locations along the main branch and the East fork of Clayton Creek during 9 sampling events from May – Oct. The sampling sites were chosen based on watershed accessibility, past historical data, and the location of potential nonpoint sources. Although the main focus was on the E.coli., field parameters including pH, turbidity, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen and oxygen saturation were also measured. The water samples were taken to the Hancock Biological Station for E. Coli. analysis. E. coli ranged from 1 to 24196.0 MPN/100 mL, and was highly variable at all locations.

Based on the land use and the collected data, the primary sources of E. Coli include septic systems and livestock used in agricultural practices.

Fall Scholars Week 2018 Event

Earth and Environmental Sciences Poster Session

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Focus Study for E. coli in the Clayton Creek Watershed

This Focus Study for E. coli in the Clayton Creek Watershed aimed to assess the water quality of the stream and determine the sources of E. Coli present in and around the watershed area. This study was initiated as a response to the sampled data collected from available scientific, government and volunteer sources.

Water samples were taken from 9 different locations along the main branch and the East fork of Clayton Creek during 9 sampling events from May – Oct. The sampling sites were chosen based on watershed accessibility, past historical data, and the location of potential nonpoint sources. Although the main focus was on the E.coli., field parameters including pH, turbidity, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen and oxygen saturation were also measured. The water samples were taken to the Hancock Biological Station for E. Coli. analysis. E. coli ranged from 1 to 24196.0 MPN/100 mL, and was highly variable at all locations.

Based on the land use and the collected data, the primary sources of E. Coli include septic systems and livestock used in agricultural practices.