Title

Hot Vegetation under the Radar

Presenter Information

Javus YandalFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Environmental Science

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Robin Q. Zhang

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

The overall objective of “Hot Vegetation under the Radar” is see the full extent of remote sensing in terms of removing danger. The overall biggest advantage to remote sensing is that anyone can view any area without being anywhere near it via the use of planes, drones, cameras, and radars. For example, an observer can overlook a volcano eruption without being near the gases, heat or lava.

One specific question determined to be answer is does today’s advancements in remote sensing give enough information before, during and after a natural disaster? Sometimes, the information recorded from a site is best when it is collected on site in person doing field analysis such as certain details like texture of object and things that cannot be viewed from far away. However, natural disaster can make that impossible. This is where remote sensing technology can come into play. Can technology such as drones and cameras within the dangers of a volcanic eruption in order to effectively obtain data?

The source and type of data that will be collected includes vegetation life before, during and after volcanic activity, topography changes, and analyzing the map differences to overall see how much of an impact volcanic activity does to not only humans but the area itself in terms of is the change permanent, temporary, or if it makes a change so dramatic that only another natural disaster can change it.

Fall Scholars Week 2018 Event

Earth and Environmental Sciences Poster Session

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Hot Vegetation under the Radar

The overall objective of “Hot Vegetation under the Radar” is see the full extent of remote sensing in terms of removing danger. The overall biggest advantage to remote sensing is that anyone can view any area without being anywhere near it via the use of planes, drones, cameras, and radars. For example, an observer can overlook a volcano eruption without being near the gases, heat or lava.

One specific question determined to be answer is does today’s advancements in remote sensing give enough information before, during and after a natural disaster? Sometimes, the information recorded from a site is best when it is collected on site in person doing field analysis such as certain details like texture of object and things that cannot be viewed from far away. However, natural disaster can make that impossible. This is where remote sensing technology can come into play. Can technology such as drones and cameras within the dangers of a volcanic eruption in order to effectively obtain data?

The source and type of data that will be collected includes vegetation life before, during and after volcanic activity, topography changes, and analyzing the map differences to overall see how much of an impact volcanic activity does to not only humans but the area itself in terms of is the change permanent, temporary, or if it makes a change so dramatic that only another natural disaster can change it.