Title

HEA 260 Medical Ethics

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Freshmen

Major

Communication Disorders

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Marisa Belew

Dr. Miranda Terry

HEA 260

October 12, 2018

Article Abstract

The introduction to medical ethics course at Murray State University discussed ethical issues in our healthcare system, clinical practice, and research providing insight on issues of practical and philosophical importance for all members of our society (Terry, 2018). One of the ways communication occurs to the general public is through media channels. Students were to find medical ethics cases within the past 6-months (March/April 2018 to October 2018) to apply the course material from a media source of their choice. Analysis of the media source was conducted using a newspaper analysis methodology.

In the article, Rehm strongly establishes her support of physician assisted suicide and the reenactment of California’s End of Life Options Act. Rehm had to stand on the sidelines and watch Breast cancer take over her friend’s body and Parkinson’s Disease deteriorate her husband’s bodily functions. At the time, the state of California had passed the California’s End of Life Options Act which allowed terminally ill patients to request deadly prescriptions. Diane Rehm’s friend wanted to go this route and end her life with medical assistance. However, before she could follow through with this plan, a Superior Court Judge in Riverside County requested an appeal to the law. To end his pain, John Rehm stopped eating and drinking and slowly starved himself after ten days. Like so many other terminally ill patients, Rehm points out that both her friend and husband were deprived of the opportunity to have a choice of suffering through an agonizingly, painful death. These end-of-life patients want to be able to push the stop button when deemed necessary.

First, the theory of consequentialism is relevant in this dilemma by looking at the Judge’s actions. Consequentialism is looking at all of the outcomes and deciding which act will produce the greatest good. When the judge made the decision to appeal the law, he was looking into the future and predicting that the law would affect more people in a negative way.

Second, the principle of autonomy is present when Diane Rehm’s friend and husband are denied physician assisted suicides. Both were competent terminally patients who were denied the right to make a decision regarding their bodies.

Third, the concept of virtue is evident when observing the doctors of both patients. Both of the doctors acted with virtues of justice, charity, mercy, and wisdom when they decided not to meet the wishes of the dying patients. No doctor wants to watch his patient suffer.

This article can help someone understand the ethical theories, principles, and concepts of Medical ethics on a simpler level. Along with dealing with the T/P/Cs above, the article also deals with non-maleficence, principlism, short-term v. long-term, and justice. It is true story that many can relate to today. Now with more knowledge about medical ethics, one can use what they know and apply it in situations that may arise in their lives.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/07/opinion/california-end-of-life-aid-in-dying.html?rref=collection%2Ftimestopic%2FAssisted%20Suicide&action=click&contentCollection=timestopics®ion=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=8&pgtype=collection

Fall Scholars Week 2018 Event

HEA 260: Medical Ethics in the Media

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HEA 260 Medical Ethics

Marisa Belew

Dr. Miranda Terry

HEA 260

October 12, 2018

Article Abstract

The introduction to medical ethics course at Murray State University discussed ethical issues in our healthcare system, clinical practice, and research providing insight on issues of practical and philosophical importance for all members of our society (Terry, 2018). One of the ways communication occurs to the general public is through media channels. Students were to find medical ethics cases within the past 6-months (March/April 2018 to October 2018) to apply the course material from a media source of their choice. Analysis of the media source was conducted using a newspaper analysis methodology.

In the article, Rehm strongly establishes her support of physician assisted suicide and the reenactment of California’s End of Life Options Act. Rehm had to stand on the sidelines and watch Breast cancer take over her friend’s body and Parkinson’s Disease deteriorate her husband’s bodily functions. At the time, the state of California had passed the California’s End of Life Options Act which allowed terminally ill patients to request deadly prescriptions. Diane Rehm’s friend wanted to go this route and end her life with medical assistance. However, before she could follow through with this plan, a Superior Court Judge in Riverside County requested an appeal to the law. To end his pain, John Rehm stopped eating and drinking and slowly starved himself after ten days. Like so many other terminally ill patients, Rehm points out that both her friend and husband were deprived of the opportunity to have a choice of suffering through an agonizingly, painful death. These end-of-life patients want to be able to push the stop button when deemed necessary.

First, the theory of consequentialism is relevant in this dilemma by looking at the Judge’s actions. Consequentialism is looking at all of the outcomes and deciding which act will produce the greatest good. When the judge made the decision to appeal the law, he was looking into the future and predicting that the law would affect more people in a negative way.

Second, the principle of autonomy is present when Diane Rehm’s friend and husband are denied physician assisted suicides. Both were competent terminally patients who were denied the right to make a decision regarding their bodies.

Third, the concept of virtue is evident when observing the doctors of both patients. Both of the doctors acted with virtues of justice, charity, mercy, and wisdom when they decided not to meet the wishes of the dying patients. No doctor wants to watch his patient suffer.

This article can help someone understand the ethical theories, principles, and concepts of Medical ethics on a simpler level. Along with dealing with the T/P/Cs above, the article also deals with non-maleficence, principlism, short-term v. long-term, and justice. It is true story that many can relate to today. Now with more knowledge about medical ethics, one can use what they know and apply it in situations that may arise in their lives.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/07/opinion/california-end-of-life-aid-in-dying.html?rref=collection%2Ftimestopic%2FAssisted%20Suicide&action=click&contentCollection=timestopics®ion=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=8&pgtype=collection