Title

The Impact of Parent-Child Relationships and Further Effects of Parent Gender on Post-Divorce Child Behavioral Adjustment

Presenter Information

Mary WeatherspoonFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Sociology/Spanish

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Jared Rosenberger; Dr. Jeffrey Osborne

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

The aim of this research project is to more carefully examine the connections between divorced parents’ relationships with their children and the children’s ultimate quality of adjustment despite experiencing their parents’ separation. Divorce carries the stigma of negatively impacting children; one purpose of this project is to demonstrate that it is still beneficial to children to have both parents actively in their lives after divorce. Additionally, of children who have a good relationship with one parent, those whose good relationship is with the same-sex parent are better-adjusted than those who only have a good relationship with the off-sex parent or with neither. Using Add Health data, I will analyze the impact of post-divorce parent-child relationships on the quality of the children’s behavioral adjustment. I hypothesize that positive parental relationships are beneficial to the behavioral well-being of children, rather than only having a strong relationship with one or neither parent. In situations where a relationship with both parents is not possible, I hypothesize that having a good relationship with the same-sex parent is more advantageous to children’s adjustment than a good relationship with the off-sex parent.

Start Date

16-11-2018 9:30 AM

Fall Scholars Week 2018 Event

Honors College Senior Theses

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Nov 16th, 9:30 AM

The Impact of Parent-Child Relationships and Further Effects of Parent Gender on Post-Divorce Child Behavioral Adjustment

The aim of this research project is to more carefully examine the connections between divorced parents’ relationships with their children and the children’s ultimate quality of adjustment despite experiencing their parents’ separation. Divorce carries the stigma of negatively impacting children; one purpose of this project is to demonstrate that it is still beneficial to children to have both parents actively in their lives after divorce. Additionally, of children who have a good relationship with one parent, those whose good relationship is with the same-sex parent are better-adjusted than those who only have a good relationship with the off-sex parent or with neither. Using Add Health data, I will analyze the impact of post-divorce parent-child relationships on the quality of the children’s behavioral adjustment. I hypothesize that positive parental relationships are beneficial to the behavioral well-being of children, rather than only having a strong relationship with one or neither parent. In situations where a relationship with both parents is not possible, I hypothesize that having a good relationship with the same-sex parent is more advantageous to children’s adjustment than a good relationship with the off-sex parent.