Title

The Impacts of Short-Term Agricultural Study Abroad

Presenter Information

Anthony "George" BittelFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Agribusiness

Presentation Format

Event

Abstract/Description

Domestic agricultural commodities are export dependent while the diets of many American consumers rely on high-value imported agricultural products. As United States agriculture and the global economy are increasingly interdependent, agribusinesses are looking for employees able to leverage international experiences. NAFSA recently reported that over 1.6% of US college students studied abroad for academic credit in 2015-16. Of these, over 55% study on short-term, faculty-led programs. Regularly cited impacts of study abroad programs include language development, intercultural and personal development, and career choices, although these impacts usually come from post-hoc survey data of students participating in longer-term programs. This research analyzes the impacts short-term agricultural study abroad programs have on students; insights of the world, their knowledge of global agriculture, and their lives. Data was collected from over 30 real-time, student-written journals, completed on different agricultural study abroad programs designed and offered by the same faculty. Data was analyzed using a qualitative analysis program to identify word frequency and themes. Frequent words included “people”, “products”, “really”, “cattle”, and “first”. Frequent verbs included “differs”’ “think”, “experience”, “produce”, and “interest”, and contextually were included in relational statements, which are associated with the analysis and synthesis levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy. The impacts of these programs on students varied by country, but collectively focused on awareness about segments of the agricultural supply chain, feeling more knowledgeable about the roles that agriculture serves in different economies, the significance of institutions to agriculture, and an ability to relate to those employed in agriculture in other countries.

Start Date

16-11-2018 12:30 PM

Fall Scholars Week 2018 Event

Honors College Senior Theses

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Nov 16th, 12:30 PM

The Impacts of Short-Term Agricultural Study Abroad

Domestic agricultural commodities are export dependent while the diets of many American consumers rely on high-value imported agricultural products. As United States agriculture and the global economy are increasingly interdependent, agribusinesses are looking for employees able to leverage international experiences. NAFSA recently reported that over 1.6% of US college students studied abroad for academic credit in 2015-16. Of these, over 55% study on short-term, faculty-led programs. Regularly cited impacts of study abroad programs include language development, intercultural and personal development, and career choices, although these impacts usually come from post-hoc survey data of students participating in longer-term programs. This research analyzes the impacts short-term agricultural study abroad programs have on students; insights of the world, their knowledge of global agriculture, and their lives. Data was collected from over 30 real-time, student-written journals, completed on different agricultural study abroad programs designed and offered by the same faculty. Data was analyzed using a qualitative analysis program to identify word frequency and themes. Frequent words included “people”, “products”, “really”, “cattle”, and “first”. Frequent verbs included “differs”’ “think”, “experience”, “produce”, and “interest”, and contextually were included in relational statements, which are associated with the analysis and synthesis levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy. The impacts of these programs on students varied by country, but collectively focused on awareness about segments of the agricultural supply chain, feeling more knowledgeable about the roles that agriculture serves in different economies, the significance of institutions to agriculture, and an ability to relate to those employed in agriculture in other countries.