Title

Creativity, Psychopathology, and Psychological Flexibility

Presenter Information

Lee CarpenterFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Clinical Psychology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Michael Bordieri, PhD.

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

The relationship between creativity and impairment in quality of life due to psychological disorder has an unclear relationship. Some studies indicate creativity and psychopathology have a significant relationship (Andreasen, 1987) while other studies indicate the two having no connection at all (Karlsson, 1970). The current study examined (1) what direct correlations exist between creative achievement and quality of life impairment, psychological inflexibility and quality of life impairment, and symptoms of psychoticism and quality of life impairment, and (2) how the indirect relationship between creative achievement and quality of life impairment in the context of symptoms of psychoticism changes at varying levels of psychological inflexibility. Data collected from Murray State University revealed significant positive correlations between creative achievement and quality of life impairment, psychological inflexibility and quality of life impairment, and symptoms of psychoticism and quality of life impairment. Furthermore, the data revealed that the indirect relationship between creative achievement and quality of life impairment in the context of symptoms of psychoticism was affected by psychological inflexibility when medium to high scores of psychological inflexibility were present. Limitations of the current study and future research are discussed.

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Psychology: Completed Projects

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Creativity, Psychopathology, and Psychological Flexibility

The relationship between creativity and impairment in quality of life due to psychological disorder has an unclear relationship. Some studies indicate creativity and psychopathology have a significant relationship (Andreasen, 1987) while other studies indicate the two having no connection at all (Karlsson, 1970). The current study examined (1) what direct correlations exist between creative achievement and quality of life impairment, psychological inflexibility and quality of life impairment, and symptoms of psychoticism and quality of life impairment, and (2) how the indirect relationship between creative achievement and quality of life impairment in the context of symptoms of psychoticism changes at varying levels of psychological inflexibility. Data collected from Murray State University revealed significant positive correlations between creative achievement and quality of life impairment, psychological inflexibility and quality of life impairment, and symptoms of psychoticism and quality of life impairment. Furthermore, the data revealed that the indirect relationship between creative achievement and quality of life impairment in the context of symptoms of psychoticism was affected by psychological inflexibility when medium to high scores of psychological inflexibility were present. Limitations of the current study and future research are discussed.