Title

Predicting Procrastination-Related Behavior on a Time-sensitive Task Based on Procrastination Scale Scores

Presenter Information

Kevin TunneyFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Photography

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Predicting Procrastination-Related Behavior on a Time-sensitive Task

Based on Procrastination Scale Scores

The current study aims to examine whether participants’ self-reported levels of procrastination would predict actual procrastination. Part 1 of this study asked participants to complete demographic information various scales, including the Pure Procrastination Scale (PPS) and the Big Five Personality traits. One week after completing Part 1, participants were emailed to inform them that they had one week to complete Part 2 of the study. Participants were asked to complete measures including the Depression, Anxiety and Stress scale (DASS-21), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and a perfectionism scale. The main outcome variable of interest was the amount of time passed between receiving the email and completing the survey for Part 2. There was no significant correlation between scores on the PPS and the delay between the reminder being sent to participants and completion of Part 2 of the survey, r = .23, p = .129. The time delay related to completing Part 2 was not significantly correlated to any of the variables in this study. There were however significant correlations between scores on the PPS and several of the other measures in this study. More specifically, those scoring higher on procrastination also scored higher on socially prescribed perfectionism, neuroticism, and DASS-21, while they scored lower on agreeableness, conscientiousness, and self-esteem. These findings suggest that it might be important to expand on the measures of procrastination beyond self-reports.

Keywords

Procrastination, Depression, Anxiety, Stress, Self Esteem, Perfectionism, Personality, Behavior

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Predicting Procrastination-Related Behavior on a Time-sensitive Task Based on Procrastination Scale Scores

Predicting Procrastination-Related Behavior on a Time-sensitive Task

Based on Procrastination Scale Scores

The current study aims to examine whether participants’ self-reported levels of procrastination would predict actual procrastination. Part 1 of this study asked participants to complete demographic information various scales, including the Pure Procrastination Scale (PPS) and the Big Five Personality traits. One week after completing Part 1, participants were emailed to inform them that they had one week to complete Part 2 of the study. Participants were asked to complete measures including the Depression, Anxiety and Stress scale (DASS-21), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and a perfectionism scale. The main outcome variable of interest was the amount of time passed between receiving the email and completing the survey for Part 2. There was no significant correlation between scores on the PPS and the delay between the reminder being sent to participants and completion of Part 2 of the survey, r = .23, p = .129. The time delay related to completing Part 2 was not significantly correlated to any of the variables in this study. There were however significant correlations between scores on the PPS and several of the other measures in this study. More specifically, those scoring higher on procrastination also scored higher on socially prescribed perfectionism, neuroticism, and DASS-21, while they scored lower on agreeableness, conscientiousness, and self-esteem. These findings suggest that it might be important to expand on the measures of procrastination beyond self-reports.

Keywords

Procrastination, Depression, Anxiety, Stress, Self Esteem, Perfectionism, Personality, Behavior