Title

Sarah's Struggle: Stigma Reduction and Personalization

Presenter Information

Casey BrughFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Sociology (2nd Major)

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Joyce

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Stigmatization of individuals with mental illness is profoundly harmful. Individuals who are stigmatized are less likely to seek and receive effective treatment and if they (Masuda, Price, Anderson, Schmertz, & Alamaras, 2009). Previous research suggests that psychoeducation can reduce stigma towards individuals with those mental illnesses (Brugh & Joyce, 2017). However, little is known about the role of personalization of vignettes in the effectiveness of stigma reduction. Therefore, the current study attempts to examine the role of language choice in the presentation of that information.

Participants received a survey with one of three vignettes describing an individual suffering from pica. The first described only pica symptoms, the second described the disorder in clinical and detached language, and the third used personal language. Preliminary analyses indicate that there is a significant difference the in level of overall stigma [F(2,48)= 6.671, p=.003], personal stigma [F(2,48)=7.680, p=.001], and perceived stigma [F(2,48)= 8.987, p=.000]. However, post hoc analyses indicate that the second two conditions are not significantly different from each other. These results indicate that teaching individuals about mental illness with or without personalization is equally as effective at reducing stigma.

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Psychology: Completed Projects

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Sarah's Struggle: Stigma Reduction and Personalization

Stigmatization of individuals with mental illness is profoundly harmful. Individuals who are stigmatized are less likely to seek and receive effective treatment and if they (Masuda, Price, Anderson, Schmertz, & Alamaras, 2009). Previous research suggests that psychoeducation can reduce stigma towards individuals with those mental illnesses (Brugh & Joyce, 2017). However, little is known about the role of personalization of vignettes in the effectiveness of stigma reduction. Therefore, the current study attempts to examine the role of language choice in the presentation of that information.

Participants received a survey with one of three vignettes describing an individual suffering from pica. The first described only pica symptoms, the second described the disorder in clinical and detached language, and the third used personal language. Preliminary analyses indicate that there is a significant difference the in level of overall stigma [F(2,48)= 6.671, p=.003], personal stigma [F(2,48)=7.680, p=.001], and perceived stigma [F(2,48)= 8.987, p=.000]. However, post hoc analyses indicate that the second two conditions are not significantly different from each other. These results indicate that teaching individuals about mental illness with or without personalization is equally as effective at reducing stigma.