Presenter Information

Cassie GonzalezFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Clinical Psychology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Esther Malm, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Healthy social skills development prepares children and adolescents for a future of healthy interactions, effective communication, and meaningful relationships. Parental involvement and aggravation in parenting contribute differently to the development of social skills. Literature suggests higher levels of parental involvement is related to higher levels of child social skills ratings, while decreased ratings of aggravation in parenting are associated with higher ratings of maternal involvement and child social skills. Whereas existing literature have explored the impact of non-resident father involvement, academic consequences, and dual-parent homes on the development of child social skills, few studies examine the effects of aggravation in parenting as a moderator in the development of social skills longitudinally. The purpose of this study is to expand on previous findings regarding the impact of maternal aggravation in parenting and maternal involvement. In this current study we examine maternal aggravation in parenting and involvement at age 3 on adolescent social engagement assessed at age 15. We hypothesized that maternal involvement and aggravation in parenting will directly affect social engagement at age 15 in respective directions, regardless of parent education and family structure. Secondly, we hypothesized that aggravation will also moderate the relationship between involvement and later social engagement. Secondary data from Fragile Families & Child Wellbeing Study longitudinal data set are currently being used to explore these relationships. Analyses is ongoing with a sample of 3,438 mother-child dyads. Results will be presented during scholar’s week.

Fall Scholars Week 2018 Event

Psychology: Completed Projects

Share

COinS
 

Parenting During Childhood on Adolescent Social Engagement

Healthy social skills development prepares children and adolescents for a future of healthy interactions, effective communication, and meaningful relationships. Parental involvement and aggravation in parenting contribute differently to the development of social skills. Literature suggests higher levels of parental involvement is related to higher levels of child social skills ratings, while decreased ratings of aggravation in parenting are associated with higher ratings of maternal involvement and child social skills. Whereas existing literature have explored the impact of non-resident father involvement, academic consequences, and dual-parent homes on the development of child social skills, few studies examine the effects of aggravation in parenting as a moderator in the development of social skills longitudinally. The purpose of this study is to expand on previous findings regarding the impact of maternal aggravation in parenting and maternal involvement. In this current study we examine maternal aggravation in parenting and involvement at age 3 on adolescent social engagement assessed at age 15. We hypothesized that maternal involvement and aggravation in parenting will directly affect social engagement at age 15 in respective directions, regardless of parent education and family structure. Secondly, we hypothesized that aggravation will also moderate the relationship between involvement and later social engagement. Secondary data from Fragile Families & Child Wellbeing Study longitudinal data set are currently being used to explore these relationships. Analyses is ongoing with a sample of 3,438 mother-child dyads. Results will be presented during scholar’s week.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.