Title

Crime Scene Investigation: The Influence of Conversation and Personality on Memory

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psycholgy

Minor

Criminal Justice

2nd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

2nd Student Major

Psychology

2nd Student Minor

Public and Community Health

3rd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

3rd Student Major

Psychology

3rd Student Minor

Special Education

4th Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

4th Student Major

Psychology

4th Student Minor

Math

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Jana Hackathorn, PhD.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Jurors often perceive eyewitness testimonies as extremely convincing (Chew, 2018), however, eyewitness misidentification bears cause to nearly 70% of overturned convictions in the U.S. (Innocence Project, 2017). The current study combines the principles of cognition and eyewitness testimony to examine the likelihood of change, and one’s confidence in, their memory. A decrease in memory accuracy resulting from participants conversing with someone who received conflicting information, and personality variables facilitating this change, are results we expect to find. Participants are still being recruited to complete multiple measures, beginning with demographics and the Big Five personality traits (BFI-10; Rammstedt & John, 2007). They watch a slideshow depicting a crime; two versions exist with varying details (e.g., gun vs. knife). Then, participants complete a memory and confidence in memory task followed by a filler task. Next, they collaborate with their fellow participant to generate a story explaining the slideshow. Finally, participants independently complete another memory test with confidence ratings. Preliminary analysis (N = 16) of memory scores indicates a significant reduction in accuracy across the two tests, t(14)=2.45, p=.028 and no difference in confidence scores, t(14)=-.01, p=.990. This indicates that conversing had no effect on participants confidence in their memory. Future analysis, with a larger sample, should convey whether certain personality traits impact memory. The implications, based on these findings, could extend beyond the realms of social and cognitive psychology, and land in a courtroom.

Keywords: eyewitness, personality, confidence, memory trace

Fall Scholars Week 2018 Event

Psychology: Projects In-Progress

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Crime Scene Investigation: The Influence of Conversation and Personality on Memory

Jurors often perceive eyewitness testimonies as extremely convincing (Chew, 2018), however, eyewitness misidentification bears cause to nearly 70% of overturned convictions in the U.S. (Innocence Project, 2017). The current study combines the principles of cognition and eyewitness testimony to examine the likelihood of change, and one’s confidence in, their memory. A decrease in memory accuracy resulting from participants conversing with someone who received conflicting information, and personality variables facilitating this change, are results we expect to find. Participants are still being recruited to complete multiple measures, beginning with demographics and the Big Five personality traits (BFI-10; Rammstedt & John, 2007). They watch a slideshow depicting a crime; two versions exist with varying details (e.g., gun vs. knife). Then, participants complete a memory and confidence in memory task followed by a filler task. Next, they collaborate with their fellow participant to generate a story explaining the slideshow. Finally, participants independently complete another memory test with confidence ratings. Preliminary analysis (N = 16) of memory scores indicates a significant reduction in accuracy across the two tests, t(14)=2.45, p=.028 and no difference in confidence scores, t(14)=-.01, p=.990. This indicates that conversing had no effect on participants confidence in their memory. Future analysis, with a larger sample, should convey whether certain personality traits impact memory. The implications, based on these findings, could extend beyond the realms of social and cognitive psychology, and land in a courtroom.

Keywords: eyewitness, personality, confidence, memory trace