Title

You're not fat!! Examining informational interventions on body image and eating attitudes

Presenter Information

Reilly SchaeferFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Public and Community Health

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Patrick Cushen, PhD

Presentation Format

Event

Abstract/Description

College students' perceived body image and eating attitudes have largely been studied for female students. Recent research has shown that male college students are showing similar percentages of body image and eating attitude issues. We are examining whether college students' negative body images can be changed through a short term intervention. It is hypothesized that the participants who have the short intervention will have an increased body image perception and eating attitudes. Participants will complete the BSQ-34 questionnaire, EAT-26 questionnaire, and a Sleep Habits questionnaire. Once these are completed, participants will either randomly be assigned the control text or experiment text. The control text is an informational pamphlet discussing sleeping habits and the experiment text is an informational pamphlet discussing body image and eating perceptions of college students. After reading the pamphlet, participants will complete the BSQ-34 questionnaire, the EAT-26 questionnaire, and a Sleep Habits questionnaire again. Results will help us to understand the general and gender-specific effectiveness of short informational interventions on body image.

Keywords: perceived body image, eating attitudes

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You're not fat!! Examining informational interventions on body image and eating attitudes

College students' perceived body image and eating attitudes have largely been studied for female students. Recent research has shown that male college students are showing similar percentages of body image and eating attitude issues. We are examining whether college students' negative body images can be changed through a short term intervention. It is hypothesized that the participants who have the short intervention will have an increased body image perception and eating attitudes. Participants will complete the BSQ-34 questionnaire, EAT-26 questionnaire, and a Sleep Habits questionnaire. Once these are completed, participants will either randomly be assigned the control text or experiment text. The control text is an informational pamphlet discussing sleeping habits and the experiment text is an informational pamphlet discussing body image and eating perceptions of college students. After reading the pamphlet, participants will complete the BSQ-34 questionnaire, the EAT-26 questionnaire, and a Sleep Habits questionnaire again. Results will help us to understand the general and gender-specific effectiveness of short informational interventions on body image.

Keywords: perceived body image, eating attitudes