Title

Studying the Effectiveness of Urban Vegetation to Mitigate Urban Heat Islands

Presenter Information

Steven CollettFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Environmental Geology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Sung-Ho Hong

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Urban areas are characterized by a dense presence of artificial surfaces that often are dark-colored. These dark colored surfaces have low albedo, meaning they absorb incoming solar radiation, increasing the land surface temperature. These areas of high land surface temperature are often warmer than the surrounding areas. This is called the urban heat island effect. Evapotranspiration is the flow of water throughout a system, via evaporation and transpiration. This flux between land surface and the atmosphere consumes energy through the change in state. By integrating parks, green spaces, and waterways throughout cities, the urban heat island effect can be negated. This project utilized Landsat TM and Landsat OLI to remotely sense land surface temperature, vegetation density, vegetation healthiness, and evapotranspiration. This project uses images from two different dates with different vegetation and water percentages in Los Angelas, California to study the effectiveness of evapotranspiration to mitigate local urban heat islands.

Fall Scholars Week 2019 Event

Earth and Environmental Sciences Poster Session

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Studying the Effectiveness of Urban Vegetation to Mitigate Urban Heat Islands

Urban areas are characterized by a dense presence of artificial surfaces that often are dark-colored. These dark colored surfaces have low albedo, meaning they absorb incoming solar radiation, increasing the land surface temperature. These areas of high land surface temperature are often warmer than the surrounding areas. This is called the urban heat island effect. Evapotranspiration is the flow of water throughout a system, via evaporation and transpiration. This flux between land surface and the atmosphere consumes energy through the change in state. By integrating parks, green spaces, and waterways throughout cities, the urban heat island effect can be negated. This project utilized Landsat TM and Landsat OLI to remotely sense land surface temperature, vegetation density, vegetation healthiness, and evapotranspiration. This project uses images from two different dates with different vegetation and water percentages in Los Angelas, California to study the effectiveness of evapotranspiration to mitigate local urban heat islands.