Title

Cultural Competence: Improving Cultural Competence to Reduce Health Disparities in Hispanics.

Presenter Information

Gloria MoralezFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Nursing & Spanish

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Elena Picech

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Cultural Competence: Improving Cultural Competences to Reduce Health Disparities in Hispanics

As we become a more diverse country, health care workers will see patients with different perspectives regarding their health, often influenced by their cultural backgrounds. The definition of Cultural competence care is respecting diversity in the patient population and cultural factors that affect health, language, communication styles, behaviors, and attitudes. The goal of cultural competence is to create an effective health care system and workforce that is capable of delivering the highest-quality care to each patient. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. 2000d states that “no person shall be subjected to discrimination on the basis of race, color, or national origin under any program or activity that receives Federal financial assistance.” The purpose of part of this policy is to clarify the responsibilities that health care workers have when caring for patients with Limited English Proficient (LEP), meaning they must provide language assistance (professional translators). The Hispanic culture will keep increasing in our surrounding counties therefore it is important that nurses are able to take into account their patients’ culture. Although hospitals by law are required to provide medical interpreters to patients, many times because “everyone else does it,” nurses use family members. By using untrained interpreters such as a family member, they are prone to omit certain information, add information, volunteer information, or summarize information. Nurses are more likely to make errors, violate confidentiality, and increased the risk for poor outcomes due to misunderstandings and misinterpretation. Furthermore, many patients do not disclose private or sensitive information to the individual who is interpreting which can cause incomplete information that can prevent them from a correct diagnosis. This paper will gather qualitative data from individuals who were used as interpreters when they were underage and will explore the effects it had on both the child and the patient that received care.

Fall Scholars Week 2019 Event

GLT 400

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Cultural Competence: Improving Cultural Competence to Reduce Health Disparities in Hispanics.

Cultural Competence: Improving Cultural Competences to Reduce Health Disparities in Hispanics

As we become a more diverse country, health care workers will see patients with different perspectives regarding their health, often influenced by their cultural backgrounds. The definition of Cultural competence care is respecting diversity in the patient population and cultural factors that affect health, language, communication styles, behaviors, and attitudes. The goal of cultural competence is to create an effective health care system and workforce that is capable of delivering the highest-quality care to each patient. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. 2000d states that “no person shall be subjected to discrimination on the basis of race, color, or national origin under any program or activity that receives Federal financial assistance.” The purpose of part of this policy is to clarify the responsibilities that health care workers have when caring for patients with Limited English Proficient (LEP), meaning they must provide language assistance (professional translators). The Hispanic culture will keep increasing in our surrounding counties therefore it is important that nurses are able to take into account their patients’ culture. Although hospitals by law are required to provide medical interpreters to patients, many times because “everyone else does it,” nurses use family members. By using untrained interpreters such as a family member, they are prone to omit certain information, add information, volunteer information, or summarize information. Nurses are more likely to make errors, violate confidentiality, and increased the risk for poor outcomes due to misunderstandings and misinterpretation. Furthermore, many patients do not disclose private or sensitive information to the individual who is interpreting which can cause incomplete information that can prevent them from a correct diagnosis. This paper will gather qualitative data from individuals who were used as interpreters when they were underage and will explore the effects it had on both the child and the patient that received care.