Presenter Information

Abby TillotsonFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Exercise Science/Pre-Health Professions

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Priscilla Maghtabi, PhD.; Brenda Reeves, PhD.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Purpose: Academic success is linked to positive learning outcomes and increased opportunities for career success. Unfortunately, many undergraduate students experience difficulties with time management to include factors of procrastination, laziness and overcommitment, which can negatively affect academic performance and success. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess perceptions of academic procrastination, laziness and overcommitment in undergraduate students.

Methods: The researchers surveyed 75 students enrolled in an exercise science program. Students completed the University’s Institutional Review Board approved informed consent, followed by the survey.

Results: Forty percent of respondents reported not having a severe procrastination problem, while 32% agreed that they do have a severe procrastination problem, and 28% indicated that they have a severe procrastination problem half the time. Additionally, 53.3% of respondents do not report being lazy, 32% report being lazy about half the time, and 14.7% self-identify as lazy. In terms of the students’ overcommitment causing academic difficulties, 16% did not agree, 22.7% agree about half the time, and 61.3% acknowledge overcommitment as a frequent conflict. Overcommitment and laziness were not related. (Chi2=19.8, p=0.23) Alternately, those who view themselves as “lazy” also reported having severe problems with procrastination (Chi2=54.45, p<0.001). Furthermore, students who are overcommitted also report having significantly (Chi2=33.3, p=0.007) higher procrastination rates.

Conclusion: Overcommitment poses a frequent conflict of interest to undergraduate students, which, in combination with laziness and procrastination, may negatively affect academic performance and success in undergraduate students.

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Perceptions of Academic Procrastination, Laziness, and Overcommitment in Undergraduate Students

Purpose: Academic success is linked to positive learning outcomes and increased opportunities for career success. Unfortunately, many undergraduate students experience difficulties with time management to include factors of procrastination, laziness and overcommitment, which can negatively affect academic performance and success. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess perceptions of academic procrastination, laziness and overcommitment in undergraduate students.

Methods: The researchers surveyed 75 students enrolled in an exercise science program. Students completed the University’s Institutional Review Board approved informed consent, followed by the survey.

Results: Forty percent of respondents reported not having a severe procrastination problem, while 32% agreed that they do have a severe procrastination problem, and 28% indicated that they have a severe procrastination problem half the time. Additionally, 53.3% of respondents do not report being lazy, 32% report being lazy about half the time, and 14.7% self-identify as lazy. In terms of the students’ overcommitment causing academic difficulties, 16% did not agree, 22.7% agree about half the time, and 61.3% acknowledge overcommitment as a frequent conflict. Overcommitment and laziness were not related. (Chi2=19.8, p=0.23) Alternately, those who view themselves as “lazy” also reported having severe problems with procrastination (Chi2=54.45, p<0.001). Furthermore, students who are overcommitted also report having significantly (Chi2=33.3, p=0.007) higher procrastination rates.

Conclusion: Overcommitment poses a frequent conflict of interest to undergraduate students, which, in combination with laziness and procrastination, may negatively affect academic performance and success in undergraduate students.

 

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