Presenter Information

Elizabeth TretterFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

English Literature

Minor

Legal Studies

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. William "Rusty" Jones

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Works of the Romance genre have long been regarded as “chick flicks” or “chick lit,” leaving scholars to question the long-standing, gendering stereotypes of romances as feminine and action/adventure works as masculine. This paper explores the connection between romances and action/adventure films by applying Northrop Frye’s six phases of romance outlined in his Anatomy of Criticism to the traditional masculine adventure film Die Hard. Not only does this application highlight strong evidence of romantic elements in Die Hard, but also, the analysis reveals a major gender disparity when it comes to feminizing the Romance genre. Why this disparity continues to persist is a question to be answered by future scholarship, but perhaps there is an explanation as to why men prefer Die Hard over other stereotypical Romances, one where the romantic hero, John McClane, represents an ideal of masculinity that acts to fulfill the wishes of a specific male audience.

Fall Scholars Week 2019 Event

Literature Research Presentations

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Die Hard: A Case Study of Masculine Romance

Works of the Romance genre have long been regarded as “chick flicks” or “chick lit,” leaving scholars to question the long-standing, gendering stereotypes of romances as feminine and action/adventure works as masculine. This paper explores the connection between romances and action/adventure films by applying Northrop Frye’s six phases of romance outlined in his Anatomy of Criticism to the traditional masculine adventure film Die Hard. Not only does this application highlight strong evidence of romantic elements in Die Hard, but also, the analysis reveals a major gender disparity when it comes to feminizing the Romance genre. Why this disparity continues to persist is a question to be answered by future scholarship, but perhaps there is an explanation as to why men prefer Die Hard over other stereotypical Romances, one where the romantic hero, John McClane, represents an ideal of masculinity that acts to fulfill the wishes of a specific male audience.

 

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