Title

Childhood Experiences in College Students

Presenter Information

Helen ChavisFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Juvenile Justice

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Amanda Joyce, PhD.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a disorder that occurs frequently in adults and even more frequently in children. It negatively impacts their daily life both in and out of the workforce/school. Parents are an important part of any child’s development and even more so for children with ADHD. There are four parenting styles defined as being either high or low in demandingness and responsiveness distinctly. The three that this study focuses on are known as authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive. This study looks at how parenting styles exhibited during the participants’ childhoods affects the frequency with which they exhibit symptoms of ADHD in young adulthood. This study also looks at how ADHD and parenting, concurrently and separately, interact with academic procrastination, which is a facet of pointlessly delaying academic responsibilities such as studying or completing papers. Currently, research shows that academic procrastination positively correlates with authoritative parenting behaviors and negatively with authoritarian and, less significantly, permissive parenting behaviors. Research also shows procrastination rates as being higher in adults with ADHD than those without, but little is known about how these factors may interact with each other to increase or reduce risk of procrastinatory behaviors. Results and implications of these results will be discussed during the presentation.

Keywords: ADHD, parenting style, procrastination, college students

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Psychology: Completed Projects

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Childhood Experiences in College Students

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a disorder that occurs frequently in adults and even more frequently in children. It negatively impacts their daily life both in and out of the workforce/school. Parents are an important part of any child’s development and even more so for children with ADHD. There are four parenting styles defined as being either high or low in demandingness and responsiveness distinctly. The three that this study focuses on are known as authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive. This study looks at how parenting styles exhibited during the participants’ childhoods affects the frequency with which they exhibit symptoms of ADHD in young adulthood. This study also looks at how ADHD and parenting, concurrently and separately, interact with academic procrastination, which is a facet of pointlessly delaying academic responsibilities such as studying or completing papers. Currently, research shows that academic procrastination positively correlates with authoritative parenting behaviors and negatively with authoritarian and, less significantly, permissive parenting behaviors. Research also shows procrastination rates as being higher in adults with ADHD than those without, but little is known about how these factors may interact with each other to increase or reduce risk of procrastinatory behaviors. Results and implications of these results will be discussed during the presentation.

Keywords: ADHD, parenting style, procrastination, college students