Title

My Role is to Feel Bad: Casual Sex Effects on Self-Esteem

Presenter Information

Imara PeraltaFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Organizational Communication

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Jana Hackathorn, PhD.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Past studies have connected sociosexuality with self-esteem (Clark, 2006; Lippa, 2009). The current study aimed to further research by examining the interaction between sociosexuality and sociocultural factors on self-esteem. Sociosexuality can be explained as the willingness to engage in non-committed sexual activity (Simpson & Gangestad, 1991). We surveyed two samples; the first group of participants (N = 210) using Amazon’s MTURK and a second group of participants (N = 307 ) using SONA, were recruited to complete an online survey including the following measures: Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965), Attitudes Towards Women Scale (Spence, Helmreich, & Stapp, 1973), Revised Sociosexual Orientation Inventory (Penke & Asendorpf, 2008), Revised Mosher Sex-Guilt Scale (Janda & Bazemore, 2011), and Sex Role Inventory (Bem, 1974). We expected that sociosexuality and self-esteem would be connected, moderated by sex of the participant. Additionally, we expected that sociocultural factors might also play a role in this relationship, such as conservative attitudes toward women’s gender roles. Results from the first sample indicated that the relationship between sociosexuality and self-esteem was moderated by sex such that the relationship between sociosexuality and self-esteem was negative for females, but there was no relationship for males. Conservative attitudes toward women was a significant mediator between for sociosexuality and self-esteem. In sum, for women unrestricted sociosexuality and conservative attitudes toward women had a negative effect on self-esteem, but for men it did not matter. Analysis for the second sample to affirm replication effects is currently being conducted.

Fall Scholars Week 2019 Event

Psychology: Completed Projects

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My Role is to Feel Bad: Casual Sex Effects on Self-Esteem

Past studies have connected sociosexuality with self-esteem (Clark, 2006; Lippa, 2009). The current study aimed to further research by examining the interaction between sociosexuality and sociocultural factors on self-esteem. Sociosexuality can be explained as the willingness to engage in non-committed sexual activity (Simpson & Gangestad, 1991). We surveyed two samples; the first group of participants (N = 210) using Amazon’s MTURK and a second group of participants (N = 307 ) using SONA, were recruited to complete an online survey including the following measures: Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965), Attitudes Towards Women Scale (Spence, Helmreich, & Stapp, 1973), Revised Sociosexual Orientation Inventory (Penke & Asendorpf, 2008), Revised Mosher Sex-Guilt Scale (Janda & Bazemore, 2011), and Sex Role Inventory (Bem, 1974). We expected that sociosexuality and self-esteem would be connected, moderated by sex of the participant. Additionally, we expected that sociocultural factors might also play a role in this relationship, such as conservative attitudes toward women’s gender roles. Results from the first sample indicated that the relationship between sociosexuality and self-esteem was moderated by sex such that the relationship between sociosexuality and self-esteem was negative for females, but there was no relationship for males. Conservative attitudes toward women was a significant mediator between for sociosexuality and self-esteem. In sum, for women unrestricted sociosexuality and conservative attitudes toward women had a negative effect on self-esteem, but for men it did not matter. Analysis for the second sample to affirm replication effects is currently being conducted.