Title

You Neglected my Emotions: Influences on Peer Acceptance

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Experimental Psychology Graduate Program

2nd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

2nd Student Major

Experimental Psychology Graduate Program

3rd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

3rd Student Major

Clinical Psychology Graduate Program

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Jana Hackathorn, PhD.

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Previous research shows that affective and cognitive knowledge impact the perception and interpretation of social cues, and as a result, the appropriate behavior that should follow (Mastow, Izard, Fine, & Trentacosta, 2002). The relationship between emotion regulation and peer acceptance can also be negative, and potentially stem from how individuals were raised by their parents. Stress, inadequate parenting, and persistent negative affect can contribute to “deviant emotion-cognition-action sequences” (Izard, Ackerman, Schoff, & Fine, 2000, p. 17). Thus, these deviant sequences deter acceptance by peers. It is important to evaluate how an individual interacts with their peers, and how outside influences relate to differing behavioral interactions (Robinson, Shaver, & Wrightsman, 2014).

The present study will address the relationship between parental rejection and peer acceptance, and whether this relationship is mediated by emotional regulation. We hypothesize that parental acceptance/neglect will be related to peer acceptance such that higher neglect predicts lower peer acceptance. Furthermore, we expect that emotional regulation will partially mediate the relationship, such that parental neglect will be related to peer acceptance through the individual’s emotional regulation. Participants were collected through the SONA system and completed an online survey. Preliminary analyses indicate support for both hypotheses. Parental neglect is negatively related to peer acceptance, and that emotional regulation is only a partial mediator, not accounting for the whole difference between these two variables. However, more data is currently being collected in an attempt to reach an adequate sample size.

Fall Scholars Week 2019 Event

Psychology: Completed Projects

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You Neglected my Emotions: Influences on Peer Acceptance

Previous research shows that affective and cognitive knowledge impact the perception and interpretation of social cues, and as a result, the appropriate behavior that should follow (Mastow, Izard, Fine, & Trentacosta, 2002). The relationship between emotion regulation and peer acceptance can also be negative, and potentially stem from how individuals were raised by their parents. Stress, inadequate parenting, and persistent negative affect can contribute to “deviant emotion-cognition-action sequences” (Izard, Ackerman, Schoff, & Fine, 2000, p. 17). Thus, these deviant sequences deter acceptance by peers. It is important to evaluate how an individual interacts with their peers, and how outside influences relate to differing behavioral interactions (Robinson, Shaver, & Wrightsman, 2014).

The present study will address the relationship between parental rejection and peer acceptance, and whether this relationship is mediated by emotional regulation. We hypothesize that parental acceptance/neglect will be related to peer acceptance such that higher neglect predicts lower peer acceptance. Furthermore, we expect that emotional regulation will partially mediate the relationship, such that parental neglect will be related to peer acceptance through the individual’s emotional regulation. Participants were collected through the SONA system and completed an online survey. Preliminary analyses indicate support for both hypotheses. Parental neglect is negatively related to peer acceptance, and that emotional regulation is only a partial mediator, not accounting for the whole difference between these two variables. However, more data is currently being collected in an attempt to reach an adequate sample size.