Title

Family Matters: The Influence of Parental Role and Attachment on Self-Efficacy and Social Anxiety

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Clinical Psychology

2nd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

2nd Student Major

Psychology

2nd Student Minor

Sociology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Amanda Joyce, PhD

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

The goal of this project was to examine the links between attachment style, social anxiety, and self efficacy. Previous research has suggested that individuals who exhibit insecure attachment styles with their parents tend to have higher levels of social anxiety (Heimberg, Hart, Schneier, & Liebowitz 2001). Additionally, Wei, Russell, & Zalalik (2005) indicated that individuals who report insecure attachment styles tend to have lower levels of self efficacy. One limitation of previous research on parental attachment is that it has tended to focus primarily on attachment to one’s mother or attachment to parents in general. Often, attachment is measured in adults by measuring their romantic attachment rather than parental attachment. This study would like to see how the attachment styles to each parental figure influence the constructs of social anxiety and self efficacy, and whether or not they influence them in different ways. In the current study, participants (n= 70, 81% female), answered several questionnaires measuring parental attachment, romantic attachment, self-efficacy, and social anxiety. Data collection for this project is ongoing, but preliminary results indicate the possibility of differences in the effects of insecure attachment with different parental roles have on these outcomes, specifically in regards to self-efficacy. Further research is needed to confirm these trends. If supported, these data would suggest that different parental roles influence the development of self efficacy and social anxiety in different ways.

Fall Scholars Week 2019 Event

Psychology: Completed Projects

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Family Matters: The Influence of Parental Role and Attachment on Self-Efficacy and Social Anxiety

The goal of this project was to examine the links between attachment style, social anxiety, and self efficacy. Previous research has suggested that individuals who exhibit insecure attachment styles with their parents tend to have higher levels of social anxiety (Heimberg, Hart, Schneier, & Liebowitz 2001). Additionally, Wei, Russell, & Zalalik (2005) indicated that individuals who report insecure attachment styles tend to have lower levels of self efficacy. One limitation of previous research on parental attachment is that it has tended to focus primarily on attachment to one’s mother or attachment to parents in general. Often, attachment is measured in adults by measuring their romantic attachment rather than parental attachment. This study would like to see how the attachment styles to each parental figure influence the constructs of social anxiety and self efficacy, and whether or not they influence them in different ways. In the current study, participants (n= 70, 81% female), answered several questionnaires measuring parental attachment, romantic attachment, self-efficacy, and social anxiety. Data collection for this project is ongoing, but preliminary results indicate the possibility of differences in the effects of insecure attachment with different parental roles have on these outcomes, specifically in regards to self-efficacy. Further research is needed to confirm these trends. If supported, these data would suggest that different parental roles influence the development of self efficacy and social anxiety in different ways.