Title

Knowledge Level and Attitudes of University Faculty Regarding Assistance Animals Compared to the General Population

Presenter Information

Anna LedonneFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Equine Science

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Michael Bordieri

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Assistance animals are becoming a greater presence on college campuses. The purpose of the current study is to explore university faculty’s confidence in defining different types of assistance animals, their knowledge of legal mandates, and their attitudes regarding assistance animals. A survey will be issued to university faculty utilizing an online program and will include measures from a previous study done by Schoenfeld-Tacher, Hellyer, Cheung, and Kogan (2017), as well as added questions to more specifically address the research questions and sample. This study will be used to compare faculty knowledge and the knowledge of the general population. Results will be discussed, and implications will be considered both for future research within this domain as well as for university faculty training programs.

Fall Scholars Week 2019 Event

Psychology: Completed Projects

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Knowledge Level and Attitudes of University Faculty Regarding Assistance Animals Compared to the General Population

Assistance animals are becoming a greater presence on college campuses. The purpose of the current study is to explore university faculty’s confidence in defining different types of assistance animals, their knowledge of legal mandates, and their attitudes regarding assistance animals. A survey will be issued to university faculty utilizing an online program and will include measures from a previous study done by Schoenfeld-Tacher, Hellyer, Cheung, and Kogan (2017), as well as added questions to more specifically address the research questions and sample. This study will be used to compare faculty knowledge and the knowledge of the general population. Results will be discussed, and implications will be considered both for future research within this domain as well as for university faculty training programs.