Title

Acculturative Stress and Depression Among Chinese International Students

Presenter Information

Jenny LiangFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Biology-Pre PA

Minor

Psychology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr.Esther Malm

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

People from different countries interact for mutual reasons including commerce and education. Relocating to other counties and cultures different from one’s own comes with benefits and challenges linked to cultural differences, adjustment, and stress. Acculturative stress is the mental, emotional and physiological tension brought about by culture shock and other factors that influence the adjustment from one's original culture to a new culture/environment (Berry, 1992). Several empirical findings show that International students rank high in experiences of Culture shock and acculturative stress. These experiences include homesickness, isolation, poor academics, depression, and self-injury (Meghani & Harvey, 2016). This study seeks to examine acculturative stress, depression and coping strategies among Chinese International Students. Secondly, the role of connectedness with family back in China, and the host country on student adjustment. It is hypothesized that:

1) Chinese International students who have great family relationships and connections will be more likely to have lower acculturative stress and depressive symptoms.

(2) Students with more connections with others in their host country and university environment will be more likely to have lower acculturative stress and depressive symptoms.

(3) Since we have limited information on Chinese students' own perspective of adjustment strategies, I seek to know (via open-ended questions) what coping strategies currently work for them.

Findings from this study will contribute to research related to acculturative stress, culture, and coping strategies, particularly for Chinese International students. Secondly, findings will give insight into potential practical intervention/prevention strategies that better support international students’ well-being and academic achievement.

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Acculturative Stress and Depression Among Chinese International Students

People from different countries interact for mutual reasons including commerce and education. Relocating to other counties and cultures different from one’s own comes with benefits and challenges linked to cultural differences, adjustment, and stress. Acculturative stress is the mental, emotional and physiological tension brought about by culture shock and other factors that influence the adjustment from one's original culture to a new culture/environment (Berry, 1992). Several empirical findings show that International students rank high in experiences of Culture shock and acculturative stress. These experiences include homesickness, isolation, poor academics, depression, and self-injury (Meghani & Harvey, 2016). This study seeks to examine acculturative stress, depression and coping strategies among Chinese International Students. Secondly, the role of connectedness with family back in China, and the host country on student adjustment. It is hypothesized that:

1) Chinese International students who have great family relationships and connections will be more likely to have lower acculturative stress and depressive symptoms.

(2) Students with more connections with others in their host country and university environment will be more likely to have lower acculturative stress and depressive symptoms.

(3) Since we have limited information on Chinese students' own perspective of adjustment strategies, I seek to know (via open-ended questions) what coping strategies currently work for them.

Findings from this study will contribute to research related to acculturative stress, culture, and coping strategies, particularly for Chinese International students. Secondly, findings will give insight into potential practical intervention/prevention strategies that better support international students’ well-being and academic achievement.