Title

Can I do this? Parental factors, peer acceptance, and self-efficacy

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Clinical Psychology

2nd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

2nd Student Major

Experimental Psychology

3rd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

3rd Student Major

Experimental Psychology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Jana Hackathorn

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Previous research has shown that social behavior relates to general peer acceptance and is strongly linked to emotional knowledge (Mastow, Izard, Fine, & Trentacosta, 2002). According to Bandura’s social learning theory, children learn to participate in, or complete social tasks based on what they observe in their surroundings with parental influence being a strong factor in learning social skills (Bandura, 2010). Self-efficacy refers to children’s confidence to complete social or intellectual tasks and is dependent upon on what is observed around them (Bandura, 2010). Parental acceptance leads to decrease in behavioral problems and more kindness and consideration for their peers, while parental negligence leads to more problematic behavior and less consideration for their peers (Aunola & Nurmi, 2005). The current study examined potential connections between parental negligence with peer acceptance and what role self-efficacy may play into this relationship (e.g., whether it is a mediator). Participants were recruited through the SONA system for Murray State University students and were asked to complete an online survey. The preliminary analysis found that there was a positive relationship between parental acceptance and peer acceptance. However, self-efficacy did not mediate this relationship. Importantly, more data is currently being collected to reach an adequate sample size.

Fall Scholars Week 2019 Event

Psychology: Completed Projects

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Can I do this? Parental factors, peer acceptance, and self-efficacy

Previous research has shown that social behavior relates to general peer acceptance and is strongly linked to emotional knowledge (Mastow, Izard, Fine, & Trentacosta, 2002). According to Bandura’s social learning theory, children learn to participate in, or complete social tasks based on what they observe in their surroundings with parental influence being a strong factor in learning social skills (Bandura, 2010). Self-efficacy refers to children’s confidence to complete social or intellectual tasks and is dependent upon on what is observed around them (Bandura, 2010). Parental acceptance leads to decrease in behavioral problems and more kindness and consideration for their peers, while parental negligence leads to more problematic behavior and less consideration for their peers (Aunola & Nurmi, 2005). The current study examined potential connections between parental negligence with peer acceptance and what role self-efficacy may play into this relationship (e.g., whether it is a mediator). Participants were recruited through the SONA system for Murray State University students and were asked to complete an online survey. The preliminary analysis found that there was a positive relationship between parental acceptance and peer acceptance. However, self-efficacy did not mediate this relationship. Importantly, more data is currently being collected to reach an adequate sample size.