Title

Failure to Reject False Beliefs: Cognitive Bias and Parent-Peer Acceptance

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Experimental Psychology

Minor

N/A

2nd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

2nd Student Major

Experimental Psychology

2nd Student Minor

N/A

3rd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

3rd Student Major

Clinical Psychology

3rd Student Minor

N/A

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Jana Hackathorn

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

The organizational/transactional theory states that adaptations that arise from challenges in one developmental stage affect how an individual responds to new challenges in later stages (Rogosch, Cicchetto, & Aber, 1995). Recent transactional theory research has examined the relationship between social cognitive skills developed in childhood as a result of parental behaviors and peer acceptance later in life. For example Kay and Green (2015) found that parental neglect is associated with higher levels of social cognitive biases. Moreover, cognitive biases that prevent individuals from being flexible in their beliefs about others are associated with worsened peer relationships (Lavallee & Parker, 2009). The current study examined whether cognitive biases influence the relationship between parental neglect and peer acceptance. Data was collected from college students at Murray State University (n = 82; m[age] = 19.20) during the Fall 2019 Semester. The preliminary results found that cognitive biases partially mediate the influence of parental neglect on peer acceptance, indicating that cognitive biases that arise from parental neglect in childhood hinder an individual's ability to form relationships later in life. However, more data is currently being collected to reach a statistically adequate sample size.

Fall Scholars Week 2019 Event

Psychology: Completed Projects

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Failure to Reject False Beliefs: Cognitive Bias and Parent-Peer Acceptance

The organizational/transactional theory states that adaptations that arise from challenges in one developmental stage affect how an individual responds to new challenges in later stages (Rogosch, Cicchetto, & Aber, 1995). Recent transactional theory research has examined the relationship between social cognitive skills developed in childhood as a result of parental behaviors and peer acceptance later in life. For example Kay and Green (2015) found that parental neglect is associated with higher levels of social cognitive biases. Moreover, cognitive biases that prevent individuals from being flexible in their beliefs about others are associated with worsened peer relationships (Lavallee & Parker, 2009). The current study examined whether cognitive biases influence the relationship between parental neglect and peer acceptance. Data was collected from college students at Murray State University (n = 82; m[age] = 19.20) during the Fall 2019 Semester. The preliminary results found that cognitive biases partially mediate the influence of parental neglect on peer acceptance, indicating that cognitive biases that arise from parental neglect in childhood hinder an individual's ability to form relationships later in life. However, more data is currently being collected to reach a statistically adequate sample size.