Title

Noelia Heredia and Antonia Jiménez: Challenging Gender Stereotypes in Flamenco Music

Presenter Information

Emily AllenFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Mathematics/Spanish

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Robert Fritz

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Since the emergence of commercialized flamenco music, there have been strict gender norms in regard to how the men and women performing can dress, dance, and play instruments. Specifically, women have been expected to only be a dancer, while men play the role of a singer or musician. While this may not necessarily be a problem on its own, because of this women have found it difficult to branch off to the role of a singer or musician themselves if they desire. This has been caused by the misogynistic stereotypes that were imposed to successfully market flamenco music to an international audience. For example, commercialized flamenco music has captivated audiences worldwide by displaying the objective beauty of graceful women in dresses dancing to flamenco music. While research is currently being done into gender roles in general society, there has yet to be adequate research done into challenging gender roles in flamenco music. My project will focus on challenging these gender roles. Through analyzing specific performances with Noelia Heredia and Antonia Jiménez, I will show how these women are proving that not all women are the same and can successfully play different roles in flamenco music. For example, in this performance Noelia sings, dances, and plays a percussion instrument, while Antonia plays the guitar. Women have been expected to play a specific role in flamenco music for many years, so it’s time for the public to realize that although women have long been trapped in the mold of what a woman must do and wear when performing flamenco music, all women are not the same, and must be treated as individuals. However, women themselves must take the first step by showing courage and branching out into the role in flamenco music they wish to play, like Noelia and Antonia have done.

Spring Scholars Week 2020 Event

GLT 400

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Noelia Heredia and Antonia Jiménez: Challenging Gender Stereotypes in Flamenco Music

Since the emergence of commercialized flamenco music, there have been strict gender norms in regard to how the men and women performing can dress, dance, and play instruments. Specifically, women have been expected to only be a dancer, while men play the role of a singer or musician. While this may not necessarily be a problem on its own, because of this women have found it difficult to branch off to the role of a singer or musician themselves if they desire. This has been caused by the misogynistic stereotypes that were imposed to successfully market flamenco music to an international audience. For example, commercialized flamenco music has captivated audiences worldwide by displaying the objective beauty of graceful women in dresses dancing to flamenco music. While research is currently being done into gender roles in general society, there has yet to be adequate research done into challenging gender roles in flamenco music. My project will focus on challenging these gender roles. Through analyzing specific performances with Noelia Heredia and Antonia Jiménez, I will show how these women are proving that not all women are the same and can successfully play different roles in flamenco music. For example, in this performance Noelia sings, dances, and plays a percussion instrument, while Antonia plays the guitar. Women have been expected to play a specific role in flamenco music for many years, so it’s time for the public to realize that although women have long been trapped in the mold of what a woman must do and wear when performing flamenco music, all women are not the same, and must be treated as individuals. However, women themselves must take the first step by showing courage and branching out into the role in flamenco music they wish to play, like Noelia and Antonia have done.