ORCA General Poster Session

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Loading...

Media is loading
 

Major

Agronomy

2nd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

2nd Student Major

Agronomy

3rd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

3rd Student Major

Agronomy

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Relationships Between Different Management Practices and Selected Soil Health Indicators

Jack Howard, Erika Lambert, Samuel Tapp, Corey Hale, Mallorie Snider, Dr. Brian Parr, and Dr. Iin Handayani

Hutson School of Agriculture, Murray State University

Abstract

Soil health is essential for growing crops productively. Healthy soils help to reduce erosion, improve nutrient cycling, and lower input cost. Understanding how crop rotations and tillage systems affect soil is key to preserving soil while also improving agricultural income and efficiency. This study was conducted in Calloway County, Kentucky to observe the effects of different management practices over nine sites of management on the West Farm. At each management site, undisturbed and disturbed soil samples were collected. Soil compaction was measured at both depths of three and nine inches using a penetrometer. Other soil characteristics measured in this study that indicate soil health include soil organic matter (SOM), soil water holding capacity (SWHC), and soil water field capacity (SWFC). This study illustrates that different management practices changed these properties at various magnitudes. The highest change was found in soil organic matter and the lowest change was found in SWHC. The detailed results of this study will be discussed in the presentation.

Keywords: Compaction, Loss on ignition, Organic matter, Soil water field capacity

Location

Waterfield Gallery

Start Date

November 2021

End Date

November 2021

Fall Scholars Week 2021 Event

EES Poster Session

Other Scholars Week Event

Agricultural Science

Share

COinS
 
Nov 19th, 1:30 PM Nov 19th, 3:30 PM

Relationships Between Different Management Practices and Selected Soil Health Indicators

Waterfield Gallery

Relationships Between Different Management Practices and Selected Soil Health Indicators

Jack Howard, Erika Lambert, Samuel Tapp, Corey Hale, Mallorie Snider, Dr. Brian Parr, and Dr. Iin Handayani

Hutson School of Agriculture, Murray State University

Abstract

Soil health is essential for growing crops productively. Healthy soils help to reduce erosion, improve nutrient cycling, and lower input cost. Understanding how crop rotations and tillage systems affect soil is key to preserving soil while also improving agricultural income and efficiency. This study was conducted in Calloway County, Kentucky to observe the effects of different management practices over nine sites of management on the West Farm. At each management site, undisturbed and disturbed soil samples were collected. Soil compaction was measured at both depths of three and nine inches using a penetrometer. Other soil characteristics measured in this study that indicate soil health include soil organic matter (SOM), soil water holding capacity (SWHC), and soil water field capacity (SWFC). This study illustrates that different management practices changed these properties at various magnitudes. The highest change was found in soil organic matter and the lowest change was found in SWHC. The detailed results of this study will be discussed in the presentation.

Keywords: Compaction, Loss on ignition, Organic matter, Soil water field capacity

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.