Honors College Senior Thesis Presentations

Title

Litigation, Legislation, and Love: The Comparative Efficacy of Policy-Making Approaches for the Expansion of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Civil Rights

Presenter Information

Mallory HarringtonFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Political Science

Minor

Biology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Paul D. Foote

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

This research examines the comparative efficacy of federal appellate court decisions and federal legislation with regards to the furtherance of civil rights on the basis of sexual orientation. The research examines efficacy based upon the number of measures which have been implemented as well as the content of each measure. The research examines federal appellate and Supreme Court decisions, as well as adopted pieces of federal legislation since 1950. It also examines the likely causes of the disparities in efficacy that are indicated in this analysis. The findings of this research indicate that litigation has been much more effective at expanding the scope of civil rights protection afforded to lesbian, gay, and bisexual people.

Location

Waterfield Gallery

Start Date

November 2021

End Date

November 2021

Fall Scholars Week 2021 Event

Honors Senior Presentations

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Litigation, Legislation, and Love: The Comparative Efficacy of Policy-Making Approaches for the Expansion of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Civil Rights

Waterfield Gallery

This research examines the comparative efficacy of federal appellate court decisions and federal legislation with regards to the furtherance of civil rights on the basis of sexual orientation. The research examines efficacy based upon the number of measures which have been implemented as well as the content of each measure. The research examines federal appellate and Supreme Court decisions, as well as adopted pieces of federal legislation since 1950. It also examines the likely causes of the disparities in efficacy that are indicated in this analysis. The findings of this research indicate that litigation has been much more effective at expanding the scope of civil rights protection afforded to lesbian, gay, and bisexual people.