CHFA | Psychology Department Showcase: Projects In-Process

Title

Individual Differences in Coping Strategies

Presenter Information

Lauren RileyFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Criminal Justice

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Patrick Cushen

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Aphantasia is the inability to produce visual imagery in one's mind. Relatively recently, it has become apparent that the ability to visualize information varies across people and represents a new and interesting individual difference. Because visualization is used in a variety of mental tasks, this characteristic of people may have wide-reaching effects on other aspects of their thinking. However, as this phenomenon is relatively new, there is limited research on those implications. This current research project seeks to investigate possible relationships between the ability to visualize and the use of certain coping strategies, particularly those that rely on mental imagery, such as meditation and mindfulness. Data from the Vividness of Visual Imagery Questionnaire (VVIQ), the Brief Resilient Coping Scale, and the Proactive Coping Inventory will be analyzed to determine a connection between visualization ability and coping mechanisms. This research could potentially impact how clinicians select therapies for individuals with visualization difficulties.

Location

Waterfield Gallery

Start Date

November 2021

End Date

November 2021

Fall Scholars Week 2021 Event

Psychology: Projects In-Progress

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Nov 16th, 9:30 AM Nov 16th, 12:30 PM

Individual Differences in Coping Strategies

Waterfield Gallery

Aphantasia is the inability to produce visual imagery in one's mind. Relatively recently, it has become apparent that the ability to visualize information varies across people and represents a new and interesting individual difference. Because visualization is used in a variety of mental tasks, this characteristic of people may have wide-reaching effects on other aspects of their thinking. However, as this phenomenon is relatively new, there is limited research on those implications. This current research project seeks to investigate possible relationships between the ability to visualize and the use of certain coping strategies, particularly those that rely on mental imagery, such as meditation and mindfulness. Data from the Vividness of Visual Imagery Questionnaire (VVIQ), the Brief Resilient Coping Scale, and the Proactive Coping Inventory will be analyzed to determine a connection between visualization ability and coping mechanisms. This research could potentially impact how clinicians select therapies for individuals with visualization difficulties.