Title

"She started it": Disciplinary Action in Education

Presenter Information

Samantha FrevilleFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Criminal Justice

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Amanda Joyce

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

There are many injustices that come with subjective punishment used in schools from tardiness to dress code violations (Morris, 2005). There is also data to support the ineffectiveness of suspensions and detentions, as the majority of student who had received one also received many more after that (Fabelo et al., 2011). The purpose of this project is to discover the injustices of disciplinary actions within the education system. Eighty-one students (mean age = 19.07; 64 female, 54 freshman, 67 Caucasian, 43 Christian) contributed data to this investigation. Participants reported on their experiences with detention, suspension, expulsion, and disciplinary alternatives in elementary, middle, and high school, as well as their school involvement and their opinions on school faculty and current discipline systems. Traditional disciplinary actions were unrelated to these opinions and involvement, but disciplinary alternatives positively predicted these outcomes. Results imply benefits of disciplinary alternatives. Results will be further discussed in presentation.

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"She started it": Disciplinary Action in Education

There are many injustices that come with subjective punishment used in schools from tardiness to dress code violations (Morris, 2005). There is also data to support the ineffectiveness of suspensions and detentions, as the majority of student who had received one also received many more after that (Fabelo et al., 2011). The purpose of this project is to discover the injustices of disciplinary actions within the education system. Eighty-one students (mean age = 19.07; 64 female, 54 freshman, 67 Caucasian, 43 Christian) contributed data to this investigation. Participants reported on their experiences with detention, suspension, expulsion, and disciplinary alternatives in elementary, middle, and high school, as well as their school involvement and their opinions on school faculty and current discipline systems. Traditional disciplinary actions were unrelated to these opinions and involvement, but disciplinary alternatives positively predicted these outcomes. Results imply benefits of disciplinary alternatives. Results will be further discussed in presentation.