Title

Volkswagen: Think Small

Presenter Information

Al-hnouf Al-harbiFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Freshmen

Major

Mass communication, public relations

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Shemberger

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

While endorsing big, gas-guzzling vehicles as status symbols were the norm in the US auto industry, Volkswagen opted to downplay this image and offer something different instead. The campaign of 1959 launched into a discussion about how slow Volkswagens are. Facts keep coming as Volkswagen didn’t claim as one of those fast cars, but at the same time triggered public with the thought of how it doesn’t consume gas, burn through tires or need frequent repairs. Though it proved to be the smart one. Tied together with the headline, “Think Small,” this was paradoxically an understatement that was somehow bold and shocking. This campaign created the provoking thought of how designers and marketers can influence the minds of an entire generation.

The ads were brilliantly made such that it would pop out from the magazines and newspapers and differentiated itself from the other me too cars of that time. It played right into the expectations of the people by portraying itself what it really is. It advertised itself as a small car and brought forward the advantages of being a small car. This gives us the idea that we should always advertise what we really are and not what people expect from us. Consumers appreciate honesty and truthfulness.

Spring Scholars Week 2019 Event

JMC 620 Strategic Communications

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Volkswagen: Think Small

While endorsing big, gas-guzzling vehicles as status symbols were the norm in the US auto industry, Volkswagen opted to downplay this image and offer something different instead. The campaign of 1959 launched into a discussion about how slow Volkswagens are. Facts keep coming as Volkswagen didn’t claim as one of those fast cars, but at the same time triggered public with the thought of how it doesn’t consume gas, burn through tires or need frequent repairs. Though it proved to be the smart one. Tied together with the headline, “Think Small,” this was paradoxically an understatement that was somehow bold and shocking. This campaign created the provoking thought of how designers and marketers can influence the minds of an entire generation.

The ads were brilliantly made such that it would pop out from the magazines and newspapers and differentiated itself from the other me too cars of that time. It played right into the expectations of the people by portraying itself what it really is. It advertised itself as a small car and brought forward the advantages of being a small car. This gives us the idea that we should always advertise what we really are and not what people expect from us. Consumers appreciate honesty and truthfulness.