Title

Utilizing Municipal Compost and Equine Stall Waste as Potential Economic Alternatives in an In-Ground Pot-in-Pot Production System

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Agronomy

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Alyx Shultz

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

For farmers in Western Kentucky, one viable source of income could be a pot-in-pot nursery production. One of the highest costs of production in this system was the planting media that the plants were grown in. Economical alternatives to high-priced, non-renewable peat-based mixes were important to consider. Unique to this region, were two renewable soil amendments that may help farmers to widen their profit margin in a pot-in-pot prodution system. This research looked at the economic viability of locally sourced horse stall waste and municipal compost as soil amendments to a traditional bark and peat based mix. Initial cost projections were favorable for both amendments. Further research was warranted on the agronomic suitability of the amendments to nursery stock production.

Keywords: bark based media, peat based media, pot-in-pot, renewable soil amendments

Spring Scholars Week 2019 Event

Other

Other Scholars Week Event

JCSET More than a Degree: Combining Classroom Knowledge with Hands-on Application in Mabel's Garden

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Utilizing Municipal Compost and Equine Stall Waste as Potential Economic Alternatives in an In-Ground Pot-in-Pot Production System

For farmers in Western Kentucky, one viable source of income could be a pot-in-pot nursery production. One of the highest costs of production in this system was the planting media that the plants were grown in. Economical alternatives to high-priced, non-renewable peat-based mixes were important to consider. Unique to this region, were two renewable soil amendments that may help farmers to widen their profit margin in a pot-in-pot prodution system. This research looked at the economic viability of locally sourced horse stall waste and municipal compost as soil amendments to a traditional bark and peat based mix. Initial cost projections were favorable for both amendments. Further research was warranted on the agronomic suitability of the amendments to nursery stock production.

Keywords: bark based media, peat based media, pot-in-pot, renewable soil amendments