Title

Smartphones and Scatterbrains: Technology Use and Attention Span

Presenter Information

Veronica EnglertFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Family and Consumer Studies

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Patrick Cushen

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Technology use is becoming more prevalent, especially the use of smartphones. This study examines the relationship between smartphone use and attention span. Participants completed computerized attention/memory tasks as well as surveys that measured smartphone addiction, smartphone use, self-reported adult ADHD symptoms, and state anxiety. Additionally, some students were asked to leave their cell phones with the researcher during the session while others were allowed to keep their cellphones in their own possession. All cellphones were turned completely off regardless of condition. Analysis of the data is in process and will be completed by the time of presentation. Results are expected to show that self-reported smartphone use will be positively related to self-reported ADHD symptoms and negatively related to performance on the computerized tasks. It is also hypothesized that the smartphone access conditions will demonstrate different scores on the computerized tasks. This research is important because investigating the relationship between regular smartphone use and attention will help to better understand the impact that technology use may have on a cognitive ability that is involved in almost all aspects of our lives.

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Smartphones and Scatterbrains: Technology Use and Attention Span

Technology use is becoming more prevalent, especially the use of smartphones. This study examines the relationship between smartphone use and attention span. Participants completed computerized attention/memory tasks as well as surveys that measured smartphone addiction, smartphone use, self-reported adult ADHD symptoms, and state anxiety. Additionally, some students were asked to leave their cell phones with the researcher during the session while others were allowed to keep their cellphones in their own possession. All cellphones were turned completely off regardless of condition. Analysis of the data is in process and will be completed by the time of presentation. Results are expected to show that self-reported smartphone use will be positively related to self-reported ADHD symptoms and negatively related to performance on the computerized tasks. It is also hypothesized that the smartphone access conditions will demonstrate different scores on the computerized tasks. This research is important because investigating the relationship between regular smartphone use and attention will help to better understand the impact that technology use may have on a cognitive ability that is involved in almost all aspects of our lives.