Title

Court-side View of Fan Influence

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Psychology

Minor

English

2nd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

2nd Student Major

Psychology

2nd Student Minor

Marketing

3rd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

3rd Student Major

Psychology

3rd Student Minor

Sociology

4th Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

4th Student Major

Archeology

4th Student Minor

Psychology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dan Wann

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Research has consistently indicated that spectators engage in various behaviors with the intent to influence the outcomes of sporting events. The current study sought to more clearly understand the different aspects of fan influence and its potential predictors. Team identification, fandom, general influence, superstition, dysfunction, desperation, prayer, instrumental aggression, verbal and behavioral encouragement, and verbal and behavioral distraction were assessed among a population of spectators at a significant university basketball game. The results indicate that all variables are correlated except for desperation. A regression analysis was used to determine individual predictors of various forms of influence. Team identification and general influence predicted total influence, prayer, and verbal encouragement. Team identification and dysfunction predicted verbal distraction. Team identification, general influence, and dysfunction predicted instrumental aggression. Team identification alone predicted encouraging, distracting, and superstitious behaviors. Team identification was the strongest predictor of all forms of fan influence.

Spring Scholars Week 2019 Event

Psychology: Completed Projects

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Court-side View of Fan Influence

Research has consistently indicated that spectators engage in various behaviors with the intent to influence the outcomes of sporting events. The current study sought to more clearly understand the different aspects of fan influence and its potential predictors. Team identification, fandom, general influence, superstition, dysfunction, desperation, prayer, instrumental aggression, verbal and behavioral encouragement, and verbal and behavioral distraction were assessed among a population of spectators at a significant university basketball game. The results indicate that all variables are correlated except for desperation. A regression analysis was used to determine individual predictors of various forms of influence. Team identification and general influence predicted total influence, prayer, and verbal encouragement. Team identification and dysfunction predicted verbal distraction. Team identification, general influence, and dysfunction predicted instrumental aggression. Team identification alone predicted encouraging, distracting, and superstitious behaviors. Team identification was the strongest predictor of all forms of fan influence.