Title

I’m not “lady-like”: Conservative views moderates relationship between women’s sociosexuality and self-esteem

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

psychology

Minor

organizational communication

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Jana Hackathorn, Phd

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Past studies have connected sexual behaviors with self-esteem (Clark, 2006; Lippa, 2009). The current study aimed to further research by examining the interaction between sociosexuality and sociocultural factors on self-esteem. We expected that sociosexuality and self-esteem would be connected, moderated by sex of the participant. Additionally, we expected that sociocultural factors might also play a role in this relationship (i.e., belief in sex roles, attitudes toward women, religiosity, sexual guilt). Participants completed an online survey including the following measures: Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965), Attitudes Towards Women Scale (Spence, Helmreich, & Stapp, 1973), Revised Sociosexual Orientation Inventory (Penke & Asendorpf, 2008), Revised Mosher Sex-Guilt Scale (Janda & Bazemore, 2011), and Sex Role Inventory (Bem, 1974). Results indicated that the relationship between SO and self-esteem was moderated by sex; sociosexuality predicted self-esteem but sex did not. The relationship between SO and self-esteem was negative for females, but there was no relationship for males. Attitudes toward women was a significant moderator for SO and self-esteem. Importantly, within the model all predictors and interactions significantly predicted self-esteem. In sum, for women unrestricted SO and conservative attitudes toward women had a negative effect on self-esteem, but for men it did not matter. This may speak to potential consequences of self-normative pressure and/or the slut-shaming that occurs as women are also more likely to slut-shame than are men (Webb, 2015).

Spring Scholars Week 2019 Event

Psychology: Completed Projects

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

I’m not “lady-like”: Conservative views moderates relationship between women’s sociosexuality and self-esteem

Past studies have connected sexual behaviors with self-esteem (Clark, 2006; Lippa, 2009). The current study aimed to further research by examining the interaction between sociosexuality and sociocultural factors on self-esteem. We expected that sociosexuality and self-esteem would be connected, moderated by sex of the participant. Additionally, we expected that sociocultural factors might also play a role in this relationship (i.e., belief in sex roles, attitudes toward women, religiosity, sexual guilt). Participants completed an online survey including the following measures: Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965), Attitudes Towards Women Scale (Spence, Helmreich, & Stapp, 1973), Revised Sociosexual Orientation Inventory (Penke & Asendorpf, 2008), Revised Mosher Sex-Guilt Scale (Janda & Bazemore, 2011), and Sex Role Inventory (Bem, 1974). Results indicated that the relationship between SO and self-esteem was moderated by sex; sociosexuality predicted self-esteem but sex did not. The relationship between SO and self-esteem was negative for females, but there was no relationship for males. Attitudes toward women was a significant moderator for SO and self-esteem. Importantly, within the model all predictors and interactions significantly predicted self-esteem. In sum, for women unrestricted SO and conservative attitudes toward women had a negative effect on self-esteem, but for men it did not matter. This may speak to potential consequences of self-normative pressure and/or the slut-shaming that occurs as women are also more likely to slut-shame than are men (Webb, 2015).