Title

Is It Me or the Work: Religiosity and Perceptions of Sex Workers?

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Mathematics

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Past studies have shown that there is a strong correlation between religiosity and sexual attitudes (e.q., Rostosky, Regnerus &Wright, 2010; Gall, Mullet & Shafighi, 2010). For example, highly religious people are less likely to watch pornography and are more likely to feel guilty about it (Campbell Kohut, 2017). Recent studies have found that the negative association between pornography and intrapersonal outcomes tend to be stronger among Americans who are higher in religiosity (Perry & Whitehead, 2019). This suggests that it isn't necessarily just the use of pornography that leads to negative outcomes but may instead be the perceptions of pornography. Thus, the current study seeks to examine if one's level of spirituality and religiosity correlates to demonizing views of pornography and individuals associated with pornography (e.g., sex workers). And, whether these views are mediated by other factors, such as sexual guilt. The convenience sample of undergraduate participants were recruited to complete an online survey. The survey contained the following measures in random order: demographics (e.g., age, sex, ethnicity), the Demonization scale (Van Proojen & Van Der Ver, 2010) for both legal and illegal adult workers, The Revised Mosher Sex Guilt scale (Janda & Bazemore, 2011), Perceptions of Pornography (Evans-DeCcco & Cowan 2001), and the Spiritual Religious Background and Behavior scale (Connors, Tonigan & Miller, 1996). We Expect that religious background will be positively correlated with sex guilt, negative perceptions of pornography, and demonization of sex workers. The data is currently being collected.

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Is It Me or the Work: Religiosity and Perceptions of Sex Workers?

Past studies have shown that there is a strong correlation between religiosity and sexual attitudes (e.q., Rostosky, Regnerus &Wright, 2010; Gall, Mullet & Shafighi, 2010). For example, highly religious people are less likely to watch pornography and are more likely to feel guilty about it (Campbell Kohut, 2017). Recent studies have found that the negative association between pornography and intrapersonal outcomes tend to be stronger among Americans who are higher in religiosity (Perry & Whitehead, 2019). This suggests that it isn't necessarily just the use of pornography that leads to negative outcomes but may instead be the perceptions of pornography. Thus, the current study seeks to examine if one's level of spirituality and religiosity correlates to demonizing views of pornography and individuals associated with pornography (e.g., sex workers). And, whether these views are mediated by other factors, such as sexual guilt. The convenience sample of undergraduate participants were recruited to complete an online survey. The survey contained the following measures in random order: demographics (e.g., age, sex, ethnicity), the Demonization scale (Van Proojen & Van Der Ver, 2010) for both legal and illegal adult workers, The Revised Mosher Sex Guilt scale (Janda & Bazemore, 2011), Perceptions of Pornography (Evans-DeCcco & Cowan 2001), and the Spiritual Religious Background and Behavior scale (Connors, Tonigan & Miller, 1996). We Expect that religious background will be positively correlated with sex guilt, negative perceptions of pornography, and demonization of sex workers. The data is currently being collected.