Title

“Hey Siri, Where Can I Get Help?” Search Patterns and Treatment Preferences

Presenter Information

Sydney HaydenFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Clinical Psychology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Michael Bordieri, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Event

Abstract/Description

This study will explore how clients get treatment information online and how the credibility of sources used impacts their treatment preferences. Many studies have shown that client preference is associated with better treatment initiation, adherence, and outcomes (Raue, P. J., et al 2009; Dwight‐Johnson, M., et al. 2000; & Swift, J. K., & Callahan, J. L., 2009). Previous research has also shown that therapy effectiveness, in part, depends on if the treatment the patient receives is what they prefer (Mergl, R., et al. 2010). While there is an abundance of research establishing the importance of treatment preference, there is relatively limited research on how clients form their preference and how information changes that preference. The purpose of this study is to explore how clients get their information and how that influences their preference. Undergraduate students at Murray State University will come into the lab and take an online survey: answering questions about themselves, their mental health and their initial treatment preference. The participants will then be randomly assigned into two groups: one group will read treatment information from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) for 10 minutes and the other group will search for their own treatment information from the web for 10 minutes. Treatment preference will be asked again following the information session. Methodological considerations and analytical strategy will be discussed.

Spring Scholars Week 2019 Event

Psychology: Projects In-Process

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

“Hey Siri, Where Can I Get Help?” Search Patterns and Treatment Preferences

This study will explore how clients get treatment information online and how the credibility of sources used impacts their treatment preferences. Many studies have shown that client preference is associated with better treatment initiation, adherence, and outcomes (Raue, P. J., et al 2009; Dwight‐Johnson, M., et al. 2000; & Swift, J. K., & Callahan, J. L., 2009). Previous research has also shown that therapy effectiveness, in part, depends on if the treatment the patient receives is what they prefer (Mergl, R., et al. 2010). While there is an abundance of research establishing the importance of treatment preference, there is relatively limited research on how clients form their preference and how information changes that preference. The purpose of this study is to explore how clients get their information and how that influences their preference. Undergraduate students at Murray State University will come into the lab and take an online survey: answering questions about themselves, their mental health and their initial treatment preference. The participants will then be randomly assigned into two groups: one group will read treatment information from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) for 10 minutes and the other group will search for their own treatment information from the web for 10 minutes. Treatment preference will be asked again following the information session. Methodological considerations and analytical strategy will be discussed.