Title

The Effects of Social Media Behaviors

Presenter Information

William CrabtreeFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology-Sociology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Sean Rife, PhD

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Previous research on the psychology of social media usage has been limited in its ability to predict actual technological use behaviors (Ellis, Davidson, Shaw, & Geyer, 2018). This study examines abnormal or unusual habitual usage of social media platforms in order to determine if there are any predictors of negative mental health outcomes, such as depression and anxiety. This research uses a new self-report measure of certain, more specific social media behaviors, more commonly labeled as “creeping” or “stalking” behaviors involving passive consumption other users’ profiles, as opposed to more interactive patterns (posting, messaging, etc.). Results will be analyzed to determine if there are predictors of depression and general anxiety. It is expected that participants who spend more time on social media passively consuming content will report higher levels of depression and anxiety.

Keywords: Social Media, Depression, Anxiety, Behavior

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The Effects of Social Media Behaviors

Previous research on the psychology of social media usage has been limited in its ability to predict actual technological use behaviors (Ellis, Davidson, Shaw, & Geyer, 2018). This study examines abnormal or unusual habitual usage of social media platforms in order to determine if there are any predictors of negative mental health outcomes, such as depression and anxiety. This research uses a new self-report measure of certain, more specific social media behaviors, more commonly labeled as “creeping” or “stalking” behaviors involving passive consumption other users’ profiles, as opposed to more interactive patterns (posting, messaging, etc.). Results will be analyzed to determine if there are predictors of depression and general anxiety. It is expected that participants who spend more time on social media passively consuming content will report higher levels of depression and anxiety.

Keywords: Social Media, Depression, Anxiety, Behavior