Title

Using Landsat and MODIS Sensor Data for Mapping Harmful Algal Blooms

Presenter Information

Zach J. ElliottFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Archaeology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Haluk Cetin

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Large algae blooms occur in bodies of water where high levels of phosphorous and other nutrients deposited from fertilizer run-off exist. These blooms pose a hazard to the animals and humans that rely on the affected body of water. Most algae blooms end up depriving the body of water of most if not all of its oxygen, therefore suffocating the aquatic life. Some types of algae are also toxic, which can spread through the food chain and affect humans. Accurate identification of areas where such blooms are located and where they might end up is an important ecological issue. Currently, the most accurate way of recording these blooms are through on-site testing of lakes/shores for levels of nutrients that might promote algae growth. The goal of this project is to utilize Landsat and MODIS imagery to detect harmful algal blooms (HABs) off the SW Florida coast as well as in various lakes in Florida. Preliminary results suggest that while it is feasible to detect algae blooms through the use of remotely sensed data, particularly by mapping Chlorophyll-a amounts in water bodies at a much faster rate than doing so through on-site means, factors such as cloud cover, atmospheric interference, lack of in situ data, and sensor noise mean that it will not be as accurate without using data gathered on-site.

Spring Scholars Week 2019 Event

Sigma Xi Poster Competition (Juried)

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Using Landsat and MODIS Sensor Data for Mapping Harmful Algal Blooms

Large algae blooms occur in bodies of water where high levels of phosphorous and other nutrients deposited from fertilizer run-off exist. These blooms pose a hazard to the animals and humans that rely on the affected body of water. Most algae blooms end up depriving the body of water of most if not all of its oxygen, therefore suffocating the aquatic life. Some types of algae are also toxic, which can spread through the food chain and affect humans. Accurate identification of areas where such blooms are located and where they might end up is an important ecological issue. Currently, the most accurate way of recording these blooms are through on-site testing of lakes/shores for levels of nutrients that might promote algae growth. The goal of this project is to utilize Landsat and MODIS imagery to detect harmful algal blooms (HABs) off the SW Florida coast as well as in various lakes in Florida. Preliminary results suggest that while it is feasible to detect algae blooms through the use of remotely sensed data, particularly by mapping Chlorophyll-a amounts in water bodies at a much faster rate than doing so through on-site means, factors such as cloud cover, atmospheric interference, lack of in situ data, and sensor noise mean that it will not be as accurate without using data gathered on-site.