COHFA | Global Languages Senior Colloquium

Title

Idioma para todes: An examination of the Argentinian discussion for an inclusive language.

Presenter Information

Dylan GluntFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Global Language/Spanish Teaching

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Benjamin Post

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

In recent decades, the concept of a more inclusive language has been a fiercely debated topic in Argentine academia. While proponents argue that languages constantly evolve and that Spanish should move in a direction that promotes inclusivity for its speakers, the opposition party would rather keep the language as it is in the hopes of maintaining linguistic preservation and to avoid potential economic and academic complications that may arise from this movement. While there are differing opinions, projects, and alternatives for a non-sexist and inclusive use of the Spanish language, after conducting an analysis of them and of their acceptance in the general and professional public of Argentina, I assert that the solution that generates fewer conflicts and less rejection by all parties is the use of a larger vocabulary with a gender neutral, and not the implementation of vowels (such as -e in todes), letters (such as x in todxs) or symbols (such as tod@s or tod*s). Over the course of my examination of the various angles of this debate, I have put forth a solution that I believe all parties will be able to accept to some extent. While there is no solution that can appease everyone invested, research has shown that the use of an expanded vocabulary would be the most preferable way to make progress on this issue.

Spring Scholars Week 2020 Event

GLT 400

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Idioma para todes: An examination of the Argentinian discussion for an inclusive language.

In recent decades, the concept of a more inclusive language has been a fiercely debated topic in Argentine academia. While proponents argue that languages constantly evolve and that Spanish should move in a direction that promotes inclusivity for its speakers, the opposition party would rather keep the language as it is in the hopes of maintaining linguistic preservation and to avoid potential economic and academic complications that may arise from this movement. While there are differing opinions, projects, and alternatives for a non-sexist and inclusive use of the Spanish language, after conducting an analysis of them and of their acceptance in the general and professional public of Argentina, I assert that the solution that generates fewer conflicts and less rejection by all parties is the use of a larger vocabulary with a gender neutral, and not the implementation of vowels (such as -e in todes), letters (such as x in todxs) or symbols (such as tod@s or tod*s). Over the course of my examination of the various angles of this debate, I have put forth a solution that I believe all parties will be able to accept to some extent. While there is no solution that can appease everyone invested, research has shown that the use of an expanded vocabulary would be the most preferable way to make progress on this issue.