Title

Social Conformity

Presenter Information

Ashlen GrubbsFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Psychology & Applied Beavioral Analysis

Minor

Sociology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Amanda Joyce

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Over half of individuals who meet a lifetime diagnosis for Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) also meet a lifetime diagnosis of Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD), and of the individuals who have an AUD diagnosis, there is a significantly higher concurrent rate of SAD (Grant et al, 2005). This relationship between deviant peers and subsequent substance use and misuse may be explained through peer imitation, peer pressure, and social learning (Dishion et al, 1994; Moffitt, 1993; Patterson & Yoerger in press). This research focuses on vaping and alcohol use and social anxiety in social groups. The goal of this research is to explain the role of social stimulation in nicotine and alcohol usage, as well as determining the extent of unintentional peer pressure. Our results suggest that there is not a link between social anxiety and these behaviors. Our results do suggest that higher rates of individuals report having recently offered alcohol to peers than individuals who report having recently peer-pressured someone into drinking. The same pattern exists for vaping behaviors as well, indicating that students need more education on indirect peer pressure. Post-hoc analyses also revealed correlations between drinking and nicotine usage.

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Social Conformity

Over half of individuals who meet a lifetime diagnosis for Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) also meet a lifetime diagnosis of Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD), and of the individuals who have an AUD diagnosis, there is a significantly higher concurrent rate of SAD (Grant et al, 2005). This relationship between deviant peers and subsequent substance use and misuse may be explained through peer imitation, peer pressure, and social learning (Dishion et al, 1994; Moffitt, 1993; Patterson & Yoerger in press). This research focuses on vaping and alcohol use and social anxiety in social groups. The goal of this research is to explain the role of social stimulation in nicotine and alcohol usage, as well as determining the extent of unintentional peer pressure. Our results suggest that there is not a link between social anxiety and these behaviors. Our results do suggest that higher rates of individuals report having recently offered alcohol to peers than individuals who report having recently peer-pressured someone into drinking. The same pattern exists for vaping behaviors as well, indicating that students need more education on indirect peer pressure. Post-hoc analyses also revealed correlations between drinking and nicotine usage.