Presenter Information

Tyler RobinsonFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Psychology

Minor

History

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Patrick Cushen

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Fewer social maxims are repeated more than to “put yourself in someone else’s shoes.” This sentiment encourages empathy by prompting one to change their entrenched thinking patterns. Empathy can be thought of as an active attempt to understand another’s perspective or the visceral sensation of identifying with another's emotions (i.e., cognitive or affective empathy; Davis, 1983). Recently, research has identified a relationship between empathy and self-serving cognitive distortions (Grieve & Panebianco, 2013). Cognitive distortions refer to predictable and inaccurate patterns of thinking. Self-serving cognitive distortions are a form of distorted thinking patterns that are steeped in self-centered attitudes, thoughts, and beliefs (Barriga & Gibbs, 1996). Research has also suggested that there is a significant relationship between empathy and sociopolitical ideology (i.e., either socially progressive or conservative; Marsden & Barnett, 2019). The primary goal of this study is to expand upon previous literature and investigate the relationships between all three variables. Participants will complete three questionnaires via an online survey. Those questionnaires include the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI; Davis, 1983) and the How I Think Questionnaire (HIT-Q) to measure empathy and thinking patterns, respectively, and demographic questions including political identification. Correlations between the different thinking biases measured by the HIT-Q will be associated with both the IRI and political identification to better understand the relationships between those variables. Ultimately, the results of this study may help to better understand what patterns of thinking are associated with aspects of empathy and political ideology.

Spring Scholars Week 2021 Event

Psychology: Projects In-Progress

Share

COinS
 

Put yourself in their shoes: Empathy and thinking patterns

Fewer social maxims are repeated more than to “put yourself in someone else’s shoes.” This sentiment encourages empathy by prompting one to change their entrenched thinking patterns. Empathy can be thought of as an active attempt to understand another’s perspective or the visceral sensation of identifying with another's emotions (i.e., cognitive or affective empathy; Davis, 1983). Recently, research has identified a relationship between empathy and self-serving cognitive distortions (Grieve & Panebianco, 2013). Cognitive distortions refer to predictable and inaccurate patterns of thinking. Self-serving cognitive distortions are a form of distorted thinking patterns that are steeped in self-centered attitudes, thoughts, and beliefs (Barriga & Gibbs, 1996). Research has also suggested that there is a significant relationship between empathy and sociopolitical ideology (i.e., either socially progressive or conservative; Marsden & Barnett, 2019). The primary goal of this study is to expand upon previous literature and investigate the relationships between all three variables. Participants will complete three questionnaires via an online survey. Those questionnaires include the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI; Davis, 1983) and the How I Think Questionnaire (HIT-Q) to measure empathy and thinking patterns, respectively, and demographic questions including political identification. Correlations between the different thinking biases measured by the HIT-Q will be associated with both the IRI and political identification to better understand the relationships between those variables. Ultimately, the results of this study may help to better understand what patterns of thinking are associated with aspects of empathy and political ideology.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.