Title

The Effects of a Digital Daily Valuing Intervention on Participant Chosen Valued Behaviors and Relationships between Meaningful Living, Psychological Flexibility, and Mental Health

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

General Experimental Psychology

2nd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

2nd Student Major

Psychology

3rd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

3rd Student Major

Developmental Trauma

4th Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Faculty/Staff

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Michael Bordieri

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a third wave behavioral therapy centered on psychological flexibility, the ability to respond to shifting contexts in service of personally held values. Within ACT, values are “freely chosen, verbally constructed consequences of ongoing, dynamic, evolving patterns of activity.” Constructing values can help individuals implement expanding patterns of meaningful behaviors and improve wellbeing. Yet, identification with hypothetical values in research do not steadily predict large increases in researcher-generated target behaviors. Researcher-decided behaviors may not hold the same evocative effect and connection to values for every participant. They may induce participants to respond by setting forth contingencies based on following rules. Our study allows participants to construct values and associated actions to ensure values are sufficiently appetitive and actions are functionally related to valuing.. Participants listened to an audio recording guiding them in understanding valuing and areas they may value, then set individualized valued behaviors. Additionally, surveys assessed psychological flexibility, psychological symptoms, and valued living. Participants are currently completing 15 days of text-based surveys assessing engagement in chosen behaviors. Texts alternate between including an audio mini-intervention and not. Using preliminary results, we will examine relationships between psychological flexibility, meaningful living, and depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms. We will also discuss the frequency of behavioral engagement in valued activities on days the mini-intervention was implemented versus days it was not. Results could inform research approaches, adjuncts to clinical treatment, and technologically-based interventions.

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The Effects of a Digital Daily Valuing Intervention on Participant Chosen Valued Behaviors and Relationships between Meaningful Living, Psychological Flexibility, and Mental Health

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a third wave behavioral therapy centered on psychological flexibility, the ability to respond to shifting contexts in service of personally held values. Within ACT, values are “freely chosen, verbally constructed consequences of ongoing, dynamic, evolving patterns of activity.” Constructing values can help individuals implement expanding patterns of meaningful behaviors and improve wellbeing. Yet, identification with hypothetical values in research do not steadily predict large increases in researcher-generated target behaviors. Researcher-decided behaviors may not hold the same evocative effect and connection to values for every participant. They may induce participants to respond by setting forth contingencies based on following rules. Our study allows participants to construct values and associated actions to ensure values are sufficiently appetitive and actions are functionally related to valuing.. Participants listened to an audio recording guiding them in understanding valuing and areas they may value, then set individualized valued behaviors. Additionally, surveys assessed psychological flexibility, psychological symptoms, and valued living. Participants are currently completing 15 days of text-based surveys assessing engagement in chosen behaviors. Texts alternate between including an audio mini-intervention and not. Using preliminary results, we will examine relationships between psychological flexibility, meaningful living, and depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms. We will also discuss the frequency of behavioral engagement in valued activities on days the mini-intervention was implemented versus days it was not. Results could inform research approaches, adjuncts to clinical treatment, and technologically-based interventions.