JCSET | Watershed Studies Institute Research Symposium

Title

Parasitism of Neoconocephalus katydids by the parasitoid fly Ormia lineifrons

Presenter Information

Kyler RogersFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Biology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Oliver Beckers, PhD

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Conspicuous signals in insect communication are intended to attract mates. These signals, however, are often exploited by eavesdroppers. Consequently, many communication systems experience natural selection and sexual selection acting in opposite directions. This can lead to new counter adaptations arising in response to selective pressure, resulting in co-evolving systems between eavesdropper and host.

I present data on the eavesdropping tachinid, Ormia lineifrons, and its interactions with Neoconocephalus katydid hosts in KY. The interactions between host/parasite in this system have not been extensively studied. I focus my efforts on establishing how many generations O. lineifrons has in KY, which of the Neoconocephalus sp are used as hosts, and what the parasitism rates are for each host. Understanding this system can provide valuable insight into how evolutionary potent the selective pressure from parasites can be on sexual signalers.

In Kentucky, this parasitoid is multivoltine and co-occurs throughout multiple Neoconocephalus seasons. Interestingly, four Neoconocephalus species were parasitized by O. lineifrons, three of which are newly discovered hosts. The parasitism rates differed between hosts and ranged between 40 and 100%. The parasitoid, O. lineifrons, exerts significant selective pressure on multiple Neoconocepahalus host species throughout the year.

Spring Scholars Week 2021 Event

Watershed Studies Institute Symposium

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Parasitism of Neoconocephalus katydids by the parasitoid fly Ormia lineifrons

Conspicuous signals in insect communication are intended to attract mates. These signals, however, are often exploited by eavesdroppers. Consequently, many communication systems experience natural selection and sexual selection acting in opposite directions. This can lead to new counter adaptations arising in response to selective pressure, resulting in co-evolving systems between eavesdropper and host.

I present data on the eavesdropping tachinid, Ormia lineifrons, and its interactions with Neoconocephalus katydid hosts in KY. The interactions between host/parasite in this system have not been extensively studied. I focus my efforts on establishing how many generations O. lineifrons has in KY, which of the Neoconocephalus sp are used as hosts, and what the parasitism rates are for each host. Understanding this system can provide valuable insight into how evolutionary potent the selective pressure from parasites can be on sexual signalers.

In Kentucky, this parasitoid is multivoltine and co-occurs throughout multiple Neoconocephalus seasons. Interestingly, four Neoconocephalus species were parasitized by O. lineifrons, three of which are newly discovered hosts. The parasitism rates differed between hosts and ranged between 40 and 100%. The parasitoid, O. lineifrons, exerts significant selective pressure on multiple Neoconocepahalus host species throughout the year.