CHFA | Psychology Department Showcase: Completed Projects

Title

"Hakuna Ma'Vodka": A Look into Mental Health, Intoxicated Hookups, and Impulsive Behaviors

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Sociology

2nd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

2nd Student Major

Psychology

2nd Student Minor

General Special Education

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Tracey McCue

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Purpose: Hooking up (i.e., sexual behavior outside of a committed relationship where partners do not expect a future relationship; HU) has been related to negative emotional (e.g., increased anxiety and depression) and physical consequences. To better understand HU, researchers have examined how alcohol or marijuana use while HU are related to negative consequences and generally find that using either AU or marijuana, are associated with negative consequences. Similarly, research has been mixed when examining emotional distress (e.g., anxiety, depression) and increased HU and HU-related negative consequences. Likewise, aspects of impulsivity (i.e., negative urgency, sensation-seeking, premeditation) have also been related to HU; although this research is mixed too.

Given the mixed findings, the current study examined how 1) depression or 2) anxiety are related to number of times HU, HU while using alcohol, or HU while using marijuana. Further, we examined the moderating effect of different aspects of impulsivity on these relations. We expected that those with either higher anxiety scores or higher depression scores would be related to HU outcomes. Further, we expected these relations to be moderated by negative urgency, sensation, and (a lack) of premeditation.

Method: Adolescent and young adult participants (n = 1086), aged 15-25 (M = 20.20; SD = 3.14), were part of a larger longitudinal study conducted from 2020-2022 (N = 1286). Participants primarily gender self-identified as women/girls (47.3%), racially self-identified as White/Caucasian (62.3%), and 29.2% of the participants ethnically self-identified as Hispanic/Latino(a). Participants completed questions regarding HU, including the number of times and using alcohol or marijuana while HU. Participants also completed the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale to measure premeditation, urgency, sensation-seeking (Whiteside & Lynam, 2001), and PROMIS measures (Celia et al., 2010) to assess anxiety and depression.

Results: Regression analyses were conducted to test the direct effects of anxiety or depression on HU outcomes and the moderation of impulsivity on these relations. Contrary to hypotheses, neither the direct effects of anxiety nor the anxietyXimpulsivity interaction on HU outcomes were significant. Both premeditation and sensation-seeking moderated the relation between depression and HU while using marijuana. The relationship between depression and using marijuana during a HU was stronger when depression was lower among those who used premeditation more; however, as depression increased the relation of HU while using marijuana decreased. For those who use premeditation less, as depression increased, the relation with HU while using marijuana increased. The moderating effect of sensation-seeking between depression and marijuana use when HU was significant. As both depression and sensation-seeking increased, endorsement of hooking-up while using marijuana increased.

Conclusions and implications: Our hypotheses were partially supported, but only for depression. From our findings, it seems that different aspects of impulsivity, when combined with depression, may serve as both protective and risk factors for HU. Future research could examine how these relations vary longitudinally and by age.

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Psychology: Completed Projects

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"Hakuna Ma'Vodka": A Look into Mental Health, Intoxicated Hookups, and Impulsive Behaviors

Purpose: Hooking up (i.e., sexual behavior outside of a committed relationship where partners do not expect a future relationship; HU) has been related to negative emotional (e.g., increased anxiety and depression) and physical consequences. To better understand HU, researchers have examined how alcohol or marijuana use while HU are related to negative consequences and generally find that using either AU or marijuana, are associated with negative consequences. Similarly, research has been mixed when examining emotional distress (e.g., anxiety, depression) and increased HU and HU-related negative consequences. Likewise, aspects of impulsivity (i.e., negative urgency, sensation-seeking, premeditation) have also been related to HU; although this research is mixed too.

Given the mixed findings, the current study examined how 1) depression or 2) anxiety are related to number of times HU, HU while using alcohol, or HU while using marijuana. Further, we examined the moderating effect of different aspects of impulsivity on these relations. We expected that those with either higher anxiety scores or higher depression scores would be related to HU outcomes. Further, we expected these relations to be moderated by negative urgency, sensation, and (a lack) of premeditation.

Method: Adolescent and young adult participants (n = 1086), aged 15-25 (M = 20.20; SD = 3.14), were part of a larger longitudinal study conducted from 2020-2022 (N = 1286). Participants primarily gender self-identified as women/girls (47.3%), racially self-identified as White/Caucasian (62.3%), and 29.2% of the participants ethnically self-identified as Hispanic/Latino(a). Participants completed questions regarding HU, including the number of times and using alcohol or marijuana while HU. Participants also completed the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale to measure premeditation, urgency, sensation-seeking (Whiteside & Lynam, 2001), and PROMIS measures (Celia et al., 2010) to assess anxiety and depression.

Results: Regression analyses were conducted to test the direct effects of anxiety or depression on HU outcomes and the moderation of impulsivity on these relations. Contrary to hypotheses, neither the direct effects of anxiety nor the anxietyXimpulsivity interaction on HU outcomes were significant. Both premeditation and sensation-seeking moderated the relation between depression and HU while using marijuana. The relationship between depression and using marijuana during a HU was stronger when depression was lower among those who used premeditation more; however, as depression increased the relation of HU while using marijuana decreased. For those who use premeditation less, as depression increased, the relation with HU while using marijuana increased. The moderating effect of sensation-seeking between depression and marijuana use when HU was significant. As both depression and sensation-seeking increased, endorsement of hooking-up while using marijuana increased.

Conclusions and implications: Our hypotheses were partially supported, but only for depression. From our findings, it seems that different aspects of impulsivity, when combined with depression, may serve as both protective and risk factors for HU. Future research could examine how these relations vary longitudinally and by age.