CHFA | Psychology Department Showcase: Projects In-Process

Title

Sleep Quality in Undergraduate Students: Examining the Role of Class Rank and Related Individual Differences

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

English

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. D. Gage Jordan

Presentation Format

Event

Abstract/Description

College students are likely to experience stress due to increased responsibilities, demanding coursework, and pressure to maintain a balance between academics and social life. Indeed, college students are at risk for experiencing clinically- significant depression and anxiety symptoms, as well as disturbances in sleep, likely as a result of these challenges. Although the relationship between these affective variables and college stressors are well-documented, less attention has been given to the factors that may help promote better sleep, with the majority of research documenting the intrinsic bidirectional nature of mood and sleep. However, some emergent literature has pointed to individual differences in coping skills and class rank as important variables. Thus, this ongoing study aims to further delineate and explore relationships between sleep quality and affective variables in college students. The primary hypothesis is that a student’s class standing will be positively associated with sleep quality, such that the further along in school the student is (e.g., an upperclassman) the better their self-reported sleep quality. Furthermore, it is hypothesized is that this relationship will be moderated by the student's perceived level of stress, such that higher levels of perceived stress will negatively impact the student’s quality of sleep, regardless of their individual class standing. It is also hypothesized that a student’s level of perceived loneliness will moderate the relationship, such that higher levels of perceived loneliness will result in a lower self-reported sleep quality. Results from this study may help better understand the factors contributing to poor sleep quality in college students.

Spring Scholars Week 2022 Event

Psychology: Projects In-Progress

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Sleep Quality in Undergraduate Students: Examining the Role of Class Rank and Related Individual Differences

College students are likely to experience stress due to increased responsibilities, demanding coursework, and pressure to maintain a balance between academics and social life. Indeed, college students are at risk for experiencing clinically- significant depression and anxiety symptoms, as well as disturbances in sleep, likely as a result of these challenges. Although the relationship between these affective variables and college stressors are well-documented, less attention has been given to the factors that may help promote better sleep, with the majority of research documenting the intrinsic bidirectional nature of mood and sleep. However, some emergent literature has pointed to individual differences in coping skills and class rank as important variables. Thus, this ongoing study aims to further delineate and explore relationships between sleep quality and affective variables in college students. The primary hypothesis is that a student’s class standing will be positively associated with sleep quality, such that the further along in school the student is (e.g., an upperclassman) the better their self-reported sleep quality. Furthermore, it is hypothesized is that this relationship will be moderated by the student's perceived level of stress, such that higher levels of perceived stress will negatively impact the student’s quality of sleep, regardless of their individual class standing. It is also hypothesized that a student’s level of perceived loneliness will moderate the relationship, such that higher levels of perceived loneliness will result in a lower self-reported sleep quality. Results from this study may help better understand the factors contributing to poor sleep quality in college students.