JCSET | Sigma Xi Poster Competition

Title

Examining the effects of forest management strategies on raptor reproductive and breeding success in the western U.S

Presenter Information

Philip KavouriarisFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Biology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Andrea Darracq, PhD.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Forest-dwelling raptors face a number of conservation threats including invasive species and habitat loss from factors such as forest pests, disease, and wildfire. Forest management strategies such as thinning, shelterwood, clearcutting, and prescribed burns can lighten fuel loads and reduce the risk and severity of wildfire. However, some species require a high amount of canopy cover to reduce energetic costs associated with thermoregulation and to provide protection from predators during the nesting period. These potential conflicts present a challenge for wildlife managers who seek to balance the needs of these species with those of the public. Here we conduct a review of the literature to examine how forest management strategies affect the reproductive and breeding success of various raptor species that inhabit the forests of the western U.S. Our results can be used by wildlife managers and conservation biologists to benefit raptor populations while accounting for human forest uses in the western U.S.

Spring Scholars Week 2022 Event

Sigma Xi Poster Competition

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Examining the effects of forest management strategies on raptor reproductive and breeding success in the western U.S

Forest-dwelling raptors face a number of conservation threats including invasive species and habitat loss from factors such as forest pests, disease, and wildfire. Forest management strategies such as thinning, shelterwood, clearcutting, and prescribed burns can lighten fuel loads and reduce the risk and severity of wildfire. However, some species require a high amount of canopy cover to reduce energetic costs associated with thermoregulation and to provide protection from predators during the nesting period. These potential conflicts present a challenge for wildlife managers who seek to balance the needs of these species with those of the public. Here we conduct a review of the literature to examine how forest management strategies affect the reproductive and breeding success of various raptor species that inhabit the forests of the western U.S. Our results can be used by wildlife managers and conservation biologists to benefit raptor populations while accounting for human forest uses in the western U.S.