JCSET | Sigma Xi Poster Competition

Title

Contribution of Agricultural Fields on Soil C Sequestration and Compaction Levels

Presenter Information

Dakota TateFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Agronomy

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Iin Handayani, PhD; Megan Taylor, PhD; Naveen Musunuru, PhD

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

The largest carbon pools in the world lie within underground. Soils have the ability to sequester C to mitigate global climate change. Therefore, helping to improve organic matter will enhance C accumulation in the agricultural topsoils. Soil organic matter content also improves soil structure by reducing compaction levels and increasing water retention and porosity. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of various agricultural management systems on soil C pools and selected soil physical properties. Soil properties examined were soil organic C, compaction, water holding capacity, bulk density, and porosity. Samples were collected at the depth interval of 0 to 7.5 cm and 7.5 to 15 cm from Jefferson County, Illinois and Calloway County, Kentucky. Grasslands are used as a reference between disturbed and undisturbed areas between cleared areas, CRP program entries and continuous crop lands. Results showed that land management practices significantly affect soil C sequestration, compaction, macro-porosity and water retention. There was a slightly trend of soil degradation in croplands. The magnitude of differences in soil properties due to depth interval is greater than land management practices. The findings of this study will contribute to the knowledge of climate change science as related to the contribution of agricultural fields to enhance soil C sequestration and improve soil aeration.

Keywords: Bulk Density, Compaction, Macro-porosity, Soil Carbon, Soil Organic Matter

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Sigma Xi Poster Competition

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Contribution of Agricultural Fields on Soil C Sequestration and Compaction Levels

The largest carbon pools in the world lie within underground. Soils have the ability to sequester C to mitigate global climate change. Therefore, helping to improve organic matter will enhance C accumulation in the agricultural topsoils. Soil organic matter content also improves soil structure by reducing compaction levels and increasing water retention and porosity. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of various agricultural management systems on soil C pools and selected soil physical properties. Soil properties examined were soil organic C, compaction, water holding capacity, bulk density, and porosity. Samples were collected at the depth interval of 0 to 7.5 cm and 7.5 to 15 cm from Jefferson County, Illinois and Calloway County, Kentucky. Grasslands are used as a reference between disturbed and undisturbed areas between cleared areas, CRP program entries and continuous crop lands. Results showed that land management practices significantly affect soil C sequestration, compaction, macro-porosity and water retention. There was a slightly trend of soil degradation in croplands. The magnitude of differences in soil properties due to depth interval is greater than land management practices. The findings of this study will contribute to the knowledge of climate change science as related to the contribution of agricultural fields to enhance soil C sequestration and improve soil aeration.

Keywords: Bulk Density, Compaction, Macro-porosity, Soil Carbon, Soil Organic Matter