JCSET | Sigma Xi Poster Competition

Title

A Review of Trail Camera Monitoring Techniques for Mammals

Presenter Information

Evan BarrFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Biology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Andrea K. Darracq

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

A Review of Trail Camera Monitoring Techniques for Mammals

Evan Barr and Andrea K. Darracq

Following implementation of management for wildlife (e.g. wildlife stand improvement, prescribed fire, changes in harvest regulations), monitoring is required to determine if the management is achieving objectives and, if necessary, to inform adaptive management strategies. However, there are many tools that can be used to monitor wildlife populations that range from relatively older technologies (e.g. trail cameras) to newer technologies (e.g. DNA monitoring). The abundance of technologies available and options to assess when considering the use of each tool can leave managers feeling overwhelmed. Trail cameras are an efficient and increasingly less expensive way to non-invasively monitor populations. However, the optimal settings (e.g. trigger speed and delay time) and method of deploying cameras (e.g.angle, height, baiting, placement location, and the number of cameras at each site) will differ based on characteristics of the organism(s) of interest (e.g. body size, body temperature, and behavior) and the surrounding environment (e.g. flooding, snow, vegetation density). My objectives are to 1) examine the costs and benefits associated with the use of different trail camera settings and deployment methods relative to environment type and mammalian species traits and 2) provide wildlife managers with a resource they can use to maximize their efficiency when using trail cameras for monitoring efforts associated with management.

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A Review of Trail Camera Monitoring Techniques for Mammals

A Review of Trail Camera Monitoring Techniques for Mammals

Evan Barr and Andrea K. Darracq

Following implementation of management for wildlife (e.g. wildlife stand improvement, prescribed fire, changes in harvest regulations), monitoring is required to determine if the management is achieving objectives and, if necessary, to inform adaptive management strategies. However, there are many tools that can be used to monitor wildlife populations that range from relatively older technologies (e.g. trail cameras) to newer technologies (e.g. DNA monitoring). The abundance of technologies available and options to assess when considering the use of each tool can leave managers feeling overwhelmed. Trail cameras are an efficient and increasingly less expensive way to non-invasively monitor populations. However, the optimal settings (e.g. trigger speed and delay time) and method of deploying cameras (e.g.angle, height, baiting, placement location, and the number of cameras at each site) will differ based on characteristics of the organism(s) of interest (e.g. body size, body temperature, and behavior) and the surrounding environment (e.g. flooding, snow, vegetation density). My objectives are to 1) examine the costs and benefits associated with the use of different trail camera settings and deployment methods relative to environment type and mammalian species traits and 2) provide wildlife managers with a resource they can use to maximize their efficiency when using trail cameras for monitoring efforts associated with management.