JCSET | Watershed Studies Institute Research Symposium

Title

Analyzing post-fledging movements and estimating home ranges of first-year Black Vultures (Coragyps atratus) in Kentucky

Presenter Information

Philip KavouriarisFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Biology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Andrea Darracq, PhD.; Matthew J. Springer, PhD.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

The period of time between a fledgling’s first flight and dispersal from its natal area is a critical life stage that affects an individual’s survival and recruitment into adult populations. In Black Vultures, young birds remain dependent on their parents for food during this prolonged period, also known as the post-fledging dependence period. We analyzed movement data from nine black vulture fledglings equipped with backpack-mounted solar-powered GPS/GSM transmitters (45g PTT, Microwave Telemetry, Inc.), which included more than 300,000 locations collected over a period of approximately 150 days. We calculated the 95% and 50% minimum convex polygon (MCP) areas to determine both the home range and core home range areas, respectively. Our results will help shed light on the movement and activity patterns of an age demographic of Black Vultures that has not been previously studied. Given increases in conflicts between vultures and humans, research on post-fledging movements will be important to better implement management regimes.

Spring Scholars Week 2022 Event

Watershed Studies Institute Symposium

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Analyzing post-fledging movements and estimating home ranges of first-year Black Vultures (Coragyps atratus) in Kentucky

The period of time between a fledgling’s first flight and dispersal from its natal area is a critical life stage that affects an individual’s survival and recruitment into adult populations. In Black Vultures, young birds remain dependent on their parents for food during this prolonged period, also known as the post-fledging dependence period. We analyzed movement data from nine black vulture fledglings equipped with backpack-mounted solar-powered GPS/GSM transmitters (45g PTT, Microwave Telemetry, Inc.), which included more than 300,000 locations collected over a period of approximately 150 days. We calculated the 95% and 50% minimum convex polygon (MCP) areas to determine both the home range and core home range areas, respectively. Our results will help shed light on the movement and activity patterns of an age demographic of Black Vultures that has not been previously studied. Given increases in conflicts between vultures and humans, research on post-fledging movements will be important to better implement management regimes.