University of Kentucky

Poster Title

STUDY 2: Lobeline Dose-Dependently Reduces Hyperactivity in a Rodent Model of Third Trimester Alcohol Exposure

Institution

University of Kentucky

Abstract

Children diagnosed with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) often display hyperactivity and are diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The available data suggest that the traditional stimulant drug therapies for treating ADHD (e.g Ritalin) may be only moderately effective in children with FAS. This has lead researchers to look for possible nonstimulant or alternative medications for this unique population. Lobeline, derived from the native plant Lobelia inflate, can inhibit both nicotineand cocaine-induced hyperactivity in adult rats. This study examined whether lobeline could reduce hyperactivity following prenatal alcohol (ALC) exposure. For this 3rd trimester model, Sprague-Dawley rat pups were given ALC (6 g/kg/day) or a control diet twice daily during the first week after birth. A non treated control group was also included. On PND 21 & 22 (~weaning age), rats received an injection of either saline or lobeline (.3 mg/kg or 1.0 mg.kg) and activity was measured for 30 min in a round open field chamber. ALC exposed pups displayed hyperactivity on the first day of testing and lobeline dose-dependently reduced this. Lobeline treatment alone had no effect on activity. These data suggest that lobeline may be a viable treatment for fetal ALC-induced hyperactivity in our rodent model. Further work will determine if this is a potential alternative treatment for other FAS related deficits or of clinical use with fetal alcohol exposed children.

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STUDY 2: Lobeline Dose-Dependently Reduces Hyperactivity in a Rodent Model of Third Trimester Alcohol Exposure

Children diagnosed with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) often display hyperactivity and are diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The available data suggest that the traditional stimulant drug therapies for treating ADHD (e.g Ritalin) may be only moderately effective in children with FAS. This has lead researchers to look for possible nonstimulant or alternative medications for this unique population. Lobeline, derived from the native plant Lobelia inflate, can inhibit both nicotineand cocaine-induced hyperactivity in adult rats. This study examined whether lobeline could reduce hyperactivity following prenatal alcohol (ALC) exposure. For this 3rd trimester model, Sprague-Dawley rat pups were given ALC (6 g/kg/day) or a control diet twice daily during the first week after birth. A non treated control group was also included. On PND 21 & 22 (~weaning age), rats received an injection of either saline or lobeline (.3 mg/kg or 1.0 mg.kg) and activity was measured for 30 min in a round open field chamber. ALC exposed pups displayed hyperactivity on the first day of testing and lobeline dose-dependently reduced this. Lobeline treatment alone had no effect on activity. These data suggest that lobeline may be a viable treatment for fetal ALC-induced hyperactivity in our rodent model. Further work will determine if this is a potential alternative treatment for other FAS related deficits or of clinical use with fetal alcohol exposed children.